Redness / Loss of feathers

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by vincecruz, Apr 2, 2015.

  1. vincecruz

    vincecruz Just Hatched

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    May 13, 2014
    Hey guys,

    I need some help. I have 7 BO and some seem to have a probelm as shown in the photos. They seemed to have lost their feathers on their butts over the winter. It's starting to get warmer now in NJ. Some aren't as bad, but the one in the photo is probably the worst.

    At first I thought they were molting. Could this be something else?

    After some research here I read that possibly protein problem? I feed them Dumor Layer Pellets and every other day I give them scratch grains 20oz cup size for 7 chickens to split. I've looked around, I don't think I have a mouse problem.

    I also read maybe they could be plucking each others feathers which I think is definitely a possibility.

    Any other thoughts on what I should do?

    Thanks!!!

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  2. MrsBrooke

    MrsBrooke Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Your poor girls! The fact that "some" seem to have it while others don't is a pretty fair indication that confinement over winter has started a feather picking problem.

    I would spend a little time observing them to see if you can identify who is doing it.

    I'd also check for parasites around her vent and ears, just in case. You'll either see little cayenne pepper flakes (mites) or white creepies (lice). Chickens WILL pull their own feathers out in frustration if they are overrun with mites and lice.

    You could look into pinless peepers, but I would do something quickly, as exposed red flesh is a target for other chickens, and I'd hate to see one of your mamas disemboweled (yes, it happens). :(

    Removing the offenders to see if the picking stops is the first and easiest option.

    I'd lose the scratch, too, personally, and just feed layer ration. Use the money you save not buying scratch to pick up extra veggies at the store for them (spaghetti squash, cantaloupe, cucumbers, cabbage, watermelon, etc). :)

    Also, welcome to BYC!

    MrsB
     
    Last edited: Apr 2, 2015
    1 person likes this.
  3. vincecruz

    vincecruz Just Hatched

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    May 13, 2014
    Thank for the info MrsB!

    I'll look again for lice and mites but I never noticed any before.

    Would this make them pluck each other more?

    1. Their roost is side by side.
    2. During the day they like to stay under their coop.

    I could also rebuild their roost and block the underside of the coop.

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  4. MrsBrooke

    MrsBrooke Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I would wager whoever has their butt pointed toward the "plucky" chickens on the roost is getting the short end here, so to speak. :(

    You might hang a curtain between the roost poles to block their view of the others. That might help.

    Definitely see if you can identify picking culprits. A few days in a dog crate in the garage may make them play nicer with everyone else.

    MrsB
     
    1 person likes this.
  5. JJSS89

    JJSS89 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    All the info from Mrs Brooke is seconded. Cut the scratch down, 20 oz of inferior feed is a lot for that few of birds.
     
    1 person likes this.
  6. justplainbatty

    justplainbatty Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I agree with that! I give maybe 16 oz of scratch to 16 LF, (3 roos in there) and one bantam = 17 birds.
    Give those girls some high protein feed or snacks like cooked eggs or meal worms to help them regrow those feathers.
     
    Last edited: Apr 2, 2015
    1 person likes this.
  7. MrsBrooke

    MrsBrooke Chillin' With My Peeps

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    X2 on extra protein!

    MrsB
     

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