Redness of legs & feet is this a form of bumblefoot?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by reneeeWA, Dec 29, 2013.

  1. reneeeWA

    reneeeWA Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 21, 2012
    North East Nevada
    Hello,
    I have a few hens I've noticed on routine inspection that have small black scabs on the bottoms of their feet. Did some research & found out this is bumblefoot :( and am getting ready to fix this soon. I also noticed that they have the beginnings of scaley leg mite so I'm treating this 1st. Don't want to stress them too much. So my question is, is I have a few hens that don't have the scabs but their legs and feet are reddish. It is winter here and very cold so could this be it? Or is this bumblefoot? One also has some foot pads that look larger than others but not necessarily "swollen".. am I over reacting? And if it is bumblefoot how do you treat with no scab or swelling? I've yet to find an avian vet anywhere near me. I can post pics if needed? I have oxine & am wondering if this could be applied here. I could really use some direction I would appreciate any feedback. Thanks!
     
    Last edited: Dec 29, 2013
  2. ChickensAreSweet

    ChickensAreSweet Heavenly Grains for Hens

    Check that your roosts aren't too high.

    Some of my hens do get reddened feet and legs on the very cold days down to 15 degrees. If the cock's legs are red it is hormones.

    I have in the past seen a tiny black scab with no swelling or redness and decided not to open it up or treat due to it possibly causing more problems. So use your judgement.

    It is very serious though if the bumblefoot gets bad enough it can kill a chicken and go up the leg and all. So if you need to cut out the cheesy stuff inside (chicken pus) there are threads on how to do it.

    But first of all I'd look for causes of the bumblefoot. Lots of mud? Places where they could be injuring their feet on fencing where they walk? High roosts?

    Make sure you treat the scaly leg for at least 2 weeks to break the life cycle. I dip legs in mineral oil (veg oil works) myself for that, every day or so x 2 weeks at least.
     
    Last edited: Dec 29, 2013
  3. reneeeWA

    reneeeWA Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 21, 2012
    North East Nevada
    Thank you for your reply :) my roosts are about 14 inches or so high but we do live in the desert and our property happens to have a lot of dirt and rocks on it in our yard & run. I'm thinking about laying some sand down because it is pretty rough terrain out here, and I'm thinking that's probably how they injured their feet. I didn't even know what bumblefoot was until about a week ago or how it was caused. This is my first flock and unfortunately this is just one of those things that I am having to learn from. we had a really bad cold snap a few weeks or so ago that kept it pretty cold during the day. But that is since cleared up and its been in the 40's and 50's during the day now and 20's and 30's at night. But the redness still hasn't gone away and their feet just seem almost sunburned or scolded for lack of a better description. Not all of them just a few.I'm kind of at a loss, I'm just hoping it's nothing too serious and if it is I want to catch it early. Thanks again for your reply I really really appreciate it
     

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