Redundancies In Medications - Do I Need All of These?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by AmyJane725, Mar 24, 2019.

  1. AmyJane725

    AmyJane725 Songster

    343
    612
    151
    Feb 22, 2019
    Western WA
    Hi guys,

    Last night, way too late, I posted a thread about first aid kit contents. I really probably should have waited until morning to post it, because it's had very little traffic. Though it says 104 views, so not sure if nobody has anything to say about it or if it counts my views, but I digress.

    I'm particularly interested in parsing out the differences in the different medications/antibiotics/antifungals/disinfectants/wound ointments/sprays.

    My original thread is here: https://www.backyardchickens.com/threads/chicken-first-aid-kit.1298269/#post-21133178

    But at this point there are so many products it's quite overwhelming. I've visited the thread casportpony started (https://www.backyardchickens.com/threads/suggestions-for-a-first-aid-kit-updated-2-16-2019.1150128/), but it isn't quite what I need. It helped for sure, but I'm still uncertain about a lot of things.

    So, let my battery of questions begin:

    1. Blukote vs. Vetericyn Plus vs. Neosporin vs. Pine Tar vs. Betadine vs. Providone Iodine vs. Clear Iodine vs. Chlorohexidine vs. Ichthamol Ointment vs. Prid Drawing Salve

    2. What is the functional difference between Betadine, Providone Idoine and Clear Iodine?

    Do I really need all of these? I feel like the idea is to have an antibacterial/antifungal/antiviral(?) agent. Do all of these basically serve the same purpose? I know the Ichthamol Ointment & Prid are supposed to be good for bumble foot. Not sure if these other things are just as good though. I also know not all of them are antifungal, so I'd love to hear from people that have used them and what they've found the greatest success with.

    3. Is dark blue the color chickens are least likely to attack? I'm looking at Vetwrap and it comes in lots of pretty colors, but I don't want to pick red, or something that is just going to draw a lot of unwanted attention. Blukote says the color is to keep birds from pecking at it. Why is that? Chickens can see more colors than we can even, so why does blue deter them? Should I get blue Vetwrap, or should I just stick with the brown/flesh colored stuff?

    4. Is there a hierarchy of antibiotics? For instance, if my chicken has an infection/respiratory issue and I try drug A and it doesn't work, I move on to B, then C then D, etc, until something finally knocks it out. Because I've seen so many antibiotics mentioned, I'm not sure if I need to have them all, or just if the one in line prior fails. Amoxicillin, penicillin, Tylan 50, etc. Is there always one you should start with, or does it depend on what the issue is?

    5. The items I currently have physically sitting in my kit right now are the following:
    Should I return any of these or do they all serve a unique purpose? I'm writing what I know about them next to them.
    -Permethrin 10: Broad-spectrum multi-use insecticide. Use for mites/lice? What the heck is this stuff that the store needs to mark down the address where it's going to be used to report to the government? I live on a well. Is this going to poison my water?
    -Tylan 50: Antibiotic for treating respiratory issues? (The box says for use in Cattle and Swine Only. Still ok to use? I'm 99% sure it is, but why does it say for them ONLY?)
    -VetRx: Supports respiratory function. This is kind of vague. What does this do exactly?
    -Neosporin: Antibacterial ointment for cuts scrapes and burns.
    -Liquid Safe-Guard (Fenbendazole): For treating Haemonchus contortus and Teladorsagia circumcinta stomach worms.
    -Nutri-Drench: for chicks that have just arrived in the mail, and nutrient support for sick birds
    -Corid (Amprolium): to treat Coccidiosis
    -Blukote: To spray on cuts/abrasions. Germicidal/fungicidal. Kills ringworm. Dries blisters/sores.
    -Pine Tar: Antipruritic, anti‐inflammatory, antibacterial and antifungal. Peck deterrent.
    -Fish Mox (Amoxicillin) - Antibiotic for various infections.
    -Coconut Oil - good for lubricating things/checking for stuck eggs
    -3 mL Syringes - for giving fluids or medication

    Gonna call on my experts here (and anyone else is welcome to chime in as well): @DobieLover, @casportpony @Nambroth, @dawg53
     
    Last edited: Mar 24, 2019
    Kris5902 and ButtonquailGirl14 like this.
  2. mixedbreeds

    mixedbreeds Songster

    Interesting I will follow also. :caf
     
    ButtonquailGirl14 likes this.
  3. AmyJane725

    AmyJane725 Songster

    343
    612
    151
    Feb 22, 2019
    Western WA
    Thanks for keeping me company :)
     
    ButtonquailGirl14 likes this.
  4. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

    25,046
    4,993
    606
    Nov 27, 2008
    Jacksonville, Florida
    As far as antibiotics go, I dont buy them unless I need them. Most likely they'll expire before actually needing them ie; tylan, fish mox, fish zole, bird sulfa etc...
    Currently I have amoxicillin and bird sulfa on hand for a previous suspected enteritis problem in one of my birds.
    I have betadine, neosporin, nu-stock, that's all. I keep corid and nutri drench mainly for new chicks.
    I currently use permethrin liquid and have used liquid sevin in the past, the latter with well water without issues (I'm still here typing.)
    I have vet wrap and used it once for bumblefoot wrap and it got wet defeating the purpose of protecting the footpad. I use duct tape to wrap the foot and it doesnt get wet and the chicken cant peck or pull it off. I also have gauze.
    I have several 3mm syringes, some with needles and a couple bigger ones, I forgot what sizes.
    I have plenty of wormers for rotation purposes, all liquids; wazine, nemex2, safeguard,
    valbazen. I have ivermectin pour on but only used it once for a suspected mite issue, it turned out to be a minor lice issue and switched and used permethrin instead.
    If my birds get tapeworms, we have plenty of feed stores and two TSC's locally to get equimax or z-gold to treat them.
     
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2019
  5. AmyJane725

    AmyJane725 Songster

    343
    612
    151
    Feb 22, 2019
    Western WA
    You're probably right. This stuff isn't cheap either, and TSC is only 15 min from my house. I just don't want to be caught in a situation where having medicine that night, vs. having to wait until the next day means the difference between life and death. I suppose it's rarely that urgent, but I worry...:oops:
     
    ButtonquailGirl14 likes this.
  6. Kathy Golla

    Kathy Golla Songster

    585
    967
    201
    Jan 2, 2017
    San Francisco Bay Area
    How long have you had chickens?
    I have found what you need on hand comes from experience, what you have encountered, where your location is and your proximity to tsc or health care.
    I’ve had chickens for two years, encountered lots of health issues, and I would say there’s only a few things I use in an emergency or like Jim says is inconvenient to get.
    To be ready for like a predator attack.
    Hibiclens, Antibiotic ointment, electrolytes, vetrap, vetricyn, gauze.
    Having a tote or dog crate available for an emergency or broody hen.
    Permethrin I use for fly spray. Ivermectin pour on I’ve used once. Some people proactively worm.
    Everything else to me you can get pretty quickly reactively, esp if you live close to a tsc.
     
    ButtonquailGirl14 likes this.
  7. AmyJane725

    AmyJane725 Songster

    343
    612
    151
    Feb 22, 2019
    Western WA
    Um...:oops: I currently don't have any chickens. I had 10-ish as a kid. The only injury we ever had to treat was a foot that got stomped on by my 3 year old brother. Parents put Blukote on it and gauze. That didn't work out great though, because the gauze would grow into the scab, and then every time they'd change the gauze the scab got ripped off and it would bleed all over again. That's how he got his name actually; Tenderfoot. Disclaimer: He survived and grew up fine. Wasn't the dominant rooster though.

    What do you find is the best way to stop the broodiness? Is there any harm in just letting her sit in the nest box outside of not eating/drinking enough? Because I feel bad forcing her away from what she wants to do. Could I just put some food/water in there with her? My friend at work says she hates it/that it's annoying because of the sounds they make and stuff, but I don't feel like that would bother me.
     
  8. Kathy Golla

    Kathy Golla Songster

    585
    967
    201
    Jan 2, 2017
    San Francisco Bay Area
    If you don’t have chickens...you are looking for this information for...?
     
  9. Kathy Golla

    Kathy Golla Songster

    585
    967
    201
    Jan 2, 2017
    San Francisco Bay Area
    OK I see now you have another thread and explain it.
    Don’t worry about broodies until you have one. You may never. Then you can decide how you want to handle it.
     
  10. It is wise to build a kit before you need it. Your question is sort of like "Why did you build a chicken coop when you don't have any chickens yet".

    :)
     
    Kris5902 and AmyJane725 like this.

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by: