Regulating rooster populations

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by southernsibe, Apr 11, 2008.

  1. southernsibe

    southernsibe Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 15, 2007
    kensington, maryland
    I have a question for anyone that has had lots of chickens over the years. How does everyone deal with having too many roosters? What possible ways are there to deal with the populations? I understand trying to buy only pullets, but and this is so sad, the one time I did buy ouf of a box that was supposed to be pullets only, I would up getting a rooster! I have way too many roosters. My hens are stressed out, and they are almost all bare backed. I've offered them on free cycle and here on BYC. I posted them on VaPetChickens. Does anyone have any ideas? I know I will have a reply that says to cull them and be done with it. I understand that intellectually, but it seems so mean just to kill something because it happened to be born male. None of the roosters I need to get rid of are mean, they are all good birds and deal with humans. There would be no hesitation if they were mean or threatened my kids. I appreciate the time anyone takes to answer.

    Rachel
     
  2. wynedot55

    wynedot55 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 28, 2007
    you can see if you can give away the extra roos.or you can butcher them.an eat them.
     
  3. GwenFarms

    GwenFarms Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I agree with butchering. The fact is that, unless your a vegetarian, you most likely eat chicken. You have given your birds a much better quality of life than what the chicken you buy in the grocery store has had, so there is no reason to feel guilty about the butchering process.
     
  4. allen wranch

    allen wranch Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    San Marcos, TX
    A few of my local feed stores will buy birds (any sex) for resale. I usually get rid of my extra roos there if I can't rehome them myself.

    The bad part is you don't know the fate of your birds when they are out of your hands.
     
  5. horsejody

    horsejody Squeaky Wheel

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    Feb 11, 2008
    Waterloo, Nebraska
    This year I wanted Jersey Giants and did not want to have live ones shipped. I bought eggs on the internet to hatch in the incubator. I knew I only needed a few, so before the eggs even went in the bator, I contacted the 4H people at the county extention office and other poultry people. I asked if any 4H kids would want my extras, pullets and/or roos. I had an excellent response. I hatched 13 giants and will keep only 5 (pullets and roos). I actually have more kids that want the birds than I have birds to give. I guess I will have to do this again next year. I would suggest you contact your local 4H people and ask them if they know of any kids looking for birds. They might especially like them if they are purebred. And who knows? You might get a kid that just needs a plain old mixed breed roo. The kids getting my birds have parental permission and will have the guidance of their clubs when learning to care for them. They also know that these are "not for slaughter" babies.

    You have nothing to lose. Give it a try.
     
  6. silkiechicken

    silkiechicken Staff PhD Premium Member

    I eat them. I know they lived a good life, had the chance to live a life instead of being culled right away, and that I know their fate and they weren't "used" by someone else for some other purpose.
     
  7. LeghornGuy

    LeghornGuy Out Of The Brooder

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    Jul 18, 2007
    New Orleans
    I think a lot folks have chickens as pet especially on this website. However, my grandparents would butcher the roosters and old hens. Today, I raise chickens for several reasons. It is a hobby, the eggs, and the enjoyment of watching them after work. While I dont have the heart to butcher the roosters and old hens, I have enjoyed stewed chicken and Bar-B-Q Chicken.

    It is fine to butcher your roosters. (guilt free)
    You can give them to the feedstore or post an ad on craigslist.

    I hope this helps.

    PS. My grandfather said, "I am a "soft-city boy" since I am unable to butcher my flock.

    Good luck with your flock
     
  8. elliemb

    elliemb Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 22, 2007
    Set up a bachelor pen if you really want to keep them. They will most likely get along if there are no hens about to compete over. This has worked for me in the past without any problems at all. It sounds like you have all your birds together, so you wont be introducing new roos, just moving them to a different spot!
     
  9. kevin2010

    kevin2010 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    tucker wv
    well why dont you build a couple seperate cages and give each roo 2 or 3 hens to live with.

    thats what i did last year and everyone lived happily until bein killed by a fox thats in the same place they are.
     

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