rehoming a mean rooster...best hope for rehab?

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by pipthepeep, Jan 4, 2011.

  1. pipthepeep

    pipthepeep Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 19, 2010
    Tomorrow my nasty rooster is going to a new home...and no, not in the freezer. :)The person who is taking him knows he has been aggressive, and wants to give him a chance to free-range with his flock of chickens. I am hoping once my roo (9 months old) is in charge of his own flock, maybe his hormones will let him settle down a bit-- up till now he hasn't had any real flock interaction. He is aggressive around "his" territory (coop and run)...usually worst when I go to put him back in the coop. Sometimes he is fine, but when he attacks, nothing seems to deter him...I kick him with my huge boots and he just comes back for more. If I am able to pick him up, he is very docile...problem is catching him:(

    Anyway, I have been honest about his aggression (he isnt old enough to do any serious serious damage with his spurs yet), but I still feel guilty about giving him to someone. I confess I am scared of him! Maybe a change of scenery will calm him down, as he won't be in HIS territory right away...at least not till he gets settled in. Does anyone have suggestions for how this new owner can give him the best chance to not resume his nasty habits? Do you recommend he try to pick him up and carry him around to show him he is boss right off the bat? Or push him around a bit to put him in his place? Or should I just suggest he carry a big stick? It will help ease my guilt feeling to be able to give some advice at least. Thanks!
     
    Last edited: Jan 4, 2011
  2. Sunny Side Up

    Sunny Side Up Count your many blessings...

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    Loxahatchee, Florida
    Ideally, his new owner should have him quarantined for 2-4 weeks, to be sure he's not harboring any illness that can infect his flock. During that time he can try to accustom his new roo to his presence, and bring him treats on a random schedule, so the roo learns to associate his new owner with good things, but never be certain just when they'll come. That will keep him hopeful & expectant that each time will be the payoff.

    How large is the new flock, and is it all hens? If so, then he can put the roo in a cage or pen near the hens at the end of his quarantine period, to gradually accustom all the birds to each other. If there are at least 10 hens, then this roo should have a lot to keep him occupied.

    It's hard to say if the roo will continue to be aggressive. I think it's easier to make a calm roo be more wary & defensive through rough handling than to tame one that is more assertive. Some folks will describe elaborate plans to tame aggressive roos, and I think they may work with some birds, but not all of them.

    I think that with so many roosters in the world, an aggressive one isn't worth the time & effort to try & tame, unless perhaps he's rescued your children from a burning building, or pooping pure golden nuggets. It's good that you told your roo's new owner about his aggression, and if you were totally honest about the worst of his behavior, you don't have anything to feel guilty about.

    I've found that a long soak in simmering broth helps make even the nastiest rooster turn out really nice...
     
  3. pipthepeep

    pipthepeep Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 19, 2010
    The new flock is all hens, not sure how many. My roo has never really been around girls before, so I think that should keep him busy for a while at least after they are introduced. I agree that, in general, it is not worth it to waste time and energy on aggressive roos when there are nice ones to be found...I think that is why I am wishing I had just destined this guy for the soup pot to save everyone else the trouble. But who knows, he might just be better off with some women of his own and an owner who is not scared of him. I also do think its possible that growing up with just one other roo and no one else to take his aggression out on but me, he might calm down once he learns some social skills and can have some dominance over his hens. If not, let's just hope his new owner likes chicken soup![​IMG]
     

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