Rehoming my roos. Heartbreaking

Discussion in 'Pictures & Stories of My Chickens' started by belindaschicks, Dec 11, 2017.

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  1. belindaschicks

    belindaschicks Songster

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    I hatched my first chicks this spring and ended up with two roos. Super sweet. They follow me around the yard and like to curl up in my jacket and nap. They even learned to sing a little Beethoven.
    Now it's time to say goodbye and I am finding it heartbreaking. Trusting the word of a stranger that she is not going to kill my sweet bantam roos. Has anyone else had a hard time doing this? Or am I going crazy over chickens?
     
    Stayc and Brahma Chicken5000 like this.
  2. EggSighted4Life

    EggSighted4Life Free Ranging

    You have to just use discernment to the best of your ability.

    They are sweet little roos right now... but once the mating hormones kick in they very often become attacking little demons who don't fear you or respect your space. I find this to be especially true for those who were cuddled boys. Yes, bantams may not be as painful as a full sized cock. But it can still hurt or even become dangerous especially if younger children are around.

    Anyone who chooses to hatch usually goes in knowing they will have to deal with some boys and understanding that may be the hardest part of the whole process.

    Although we do eat our extra Silkie boys, lot's of people won't even bat an eye at bantams. One way to ensure they won't become supper is charge $5 instead of free. Most people willing to pay aren't also willing to process to be *more* likely to have them as pets. Let's be real, you can buy a whole roasted chicken for $5 at Costco.

    Anyways, I really am trying to be encouraging and sorry if it didn't come out that way. :hugs

    Have conversations, if people are vague or act squirrelly.. forget about them.

    Don't know about your housing situation... but I keep a stag pen for my boys who are here long term, to prevent over mating and control my genetics. I know plenty on here also keep stag pens just because they don't wanna see the boys go.

    Good luck finding homes. :fl

    We are all a little chicken crazy here! ;)
     
  3. red horse ranch

    red horse ranch Crowing

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    When I first started hatching and raising chickens I would cry whenever I had to harvest 'my boys'. Now I don't let myself get attached to the males until they are mature and I know that they are 'good' roosters who will be staying the rest of their life.

    I have 6 roosters right now and often have 8 to 10. But an aggressive rooster becomes supper without any second thoughts.
    :th:drool
     
  4. Brahma Chicken5000

    Brahma Chicken5000 Araucana Addict Premium Member

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    No you are not the only one who finds it hard to rehome cockerels/roosters. I had to rehome 3 different cockerels that were supposed to be pullets in 3 seperate occasions. First was Marcy my light brahma cockerel. He was so beautiful. He wasn’t so nice but he was 7 months old when I had to rehome him, so I hope he mellowed out. Then there was Martin my black silkie cockerel he has 4 toes. And then there was Sam my sebright cockerel. I cried when I had to rehome each of them and I still miss them terribly. Martin would watch tv with me and once a dog was barking in the movie I was watching and he was trying to scare it away. My town doesn’t allow roosters, which really stinks.
     
  5. theoldchick

    theoldchick The Chicken Whisperer Premium Member

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    I don't like it either so I try to rehome them as soon as I realize they are boys. It's only natural as us females have that maternal bond toward all things we raise. I learned not to name them and my only criteria is that they not be used for fighting. If you think letting your rooster go is tough, try hand raising cockatiels-the hands on feeding-taking them to work with you to keep up with the feeding schedule on your timed breaks- cleaning their bottoms..... getting up every two hours at night....now that'll break your heart!
     
  6. Chickassan

    Chickassan Free Ranging

    It's hard to give the boys away but try to think positively, there is a good chance you are giving this lady some nice bantam roos as pets or breeders not as dinners. Not too many people are going to go through all the trouble just to eat a tiny rooster. :)
     
  7. belindaschicks

    belindaschicks Songster

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    This is my first. It something I have to do trying to buck up not cry. I'm in my 30s after all. This 2 year chicken farming experiment has shown me that I love farming and have to harden my heart. Hoping to do a farm apprenticeship next year to better prepare myself. Being single and wanting to be a farmer is such a big goal. One I hope to one day Achieve. I just need to to be able to separate myself better. Something I thought I would be ok at seeing as I used to work in vet medicine and wildlife rehab.
     
  8. Chickassan

    Chickassan Free Ranging

    Oh honey, you don't have to do all that. If you can give them away and not feel something then there's a problem. You're human, stay human. ;)
     
  9. VeggieGoneEggie

    VeggieGoneEggie Songster

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    Aw, I feel for you!!!

    Someday, I'm going to get a house with some land, and I'm going to have a very special bachelor pad for some roos...
     
  10. Brahma Chicken5000

    Brahma Chicken5000 Araucana Addict Premium Member

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    X2
     
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