Rental home and backyard poultry experiences?

Discussion in 'Local Chicken Laws & Ordinances (and how to change' started by June2012, Nov 15, 2016.

  1. June2012

    June2012 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    *I am SO SORRY if I posted this in the wrong section!! I'll try and move it elsewhere...

    I'm living in a rental home and my dream has always been raising something in my backyard -- whether that be chickens, ducks, or geese. But I want to know if this is even common or feasible.

    What has been your experiences with raising livestock in a backyard you don't own? I would like some insight on those who raise their poultry in a more suburban area as that's my current situation, but I welcome all stories!!

    TIA!
     
  2. Ol Grey Mare

    Ol Grey Mare One egg shy of a full carton. ..... Premium Member

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    My Coop
    The first step is to discuss your wishes with your landlord -- some are open to the idea, others are not -- additionally, you also have to know and understand the local ordinances that would apply to the place you live (this can be helpful to know in advance of talking to the landlord so that you are prepared to answer any questions they may have, showing you are prepared and informed). The good news is, with the growing popularity of "urban homesteading" there has been an increase in awareness/openness in the rental sector as well. We are fortunate in that the home we are in at the moment (a rental) is one where the landlord is very open to the idea....we've only been here since August, having re-located across country and sold my flock in the process, so construction of my new coop setup will begin this winter and chicks will *hopefully* be in the brooder in February)
    Talking with the landlord will also help to answer things such as coop design -- because you are renting it may be necessary to follow more mobile coop plans vs. a larger, fixed coop structure -- this, too, goes back to the individual landlord as what they are comfortable having built on their property can vary quite a lot. Having a few different ideas that you can show them when you open the dialogue (if they show an openeness to the idea) is a great idea.
     
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  3. June2012

    June2012 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I actually moved cross country too HAHA! Research the area, what kind of coop is mobile and not a fixed building etc. first and talk to my landlord then see what happens. Thank you so much for the ideas!!!
     
  4. Leihamarie

    Leihamarie Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I live in a rental and have chickens. I made sure it was okay with my landlord, researched the local regulations, and built my coop according to the city codes. Now I have chickens! :) It's my teeny-tiny little slice of farm living in the city :-D
     
  5. June2012

    June2012 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I am in the process of researching my local regulations, but information is so limited. GAH! And you are very lucky! I wish you more luck and send great love to you, and your flock!!!

    If I may, would you mind me asking how suburban your area is? My neighbors are annoyingly close, and I want to make sure that I don't get any complaints about the smell or noise. Which is why I am leaning towards ducks because they seem more quiet than chickens, who just love to announce the laying of an egg. [​IMG]
     
  6. Teila

    Teila Bambrook Bantams Premium Member

    Howdy June2012

    We live smack bang in the middle of suburbia with neighbours close by and also in a rental property. I cleared the chickens with my original Landlord and when the property was sold [with us in tenancy] the new owners were also happy for the chickens to stay. As we had been what I consider to be good tenants for three years at that time, they could see that the place was well looked after, kept tidy, no chicken damage etc.

    If you do the right thing by your Landlord they are usually willing to allow some extras.

    As a renter, my biggest fear is that if we are asked to move on, we will need to find somewhere we can take the gals. However, the property owner is an investor so unless they get the idea to move in a family member or similar, after 6 years, we should be fairly safe. We sign 12 month leases.

    The other fear is that if the property should go up for sale again, the new owner may not be chicken friendly.

    One thing to definitely note in suburbia is that chickens, even hens, can be noisy at times but sharing eggs with your neighbours can help [​IMG]

    If you are concerned about the neighbours, I would raise it with them as well as the Landlord. Let them know your plans and that if they do have complaints when the girls arrive to please raise them with you so that you can address them and not go straight to the authorities to complain.

    Around here, my gals are no noisier than the barking dogs, loud children, car fanatics [screeching tyres] and wild birds that greet the dawn with great gusto [​IMG] A couple of my neighbours, who I get along with well, have mentioned that they actually enjoy listening to the girls sing the egg song.
     
    Last edited: Nov 17, 2016
  7. Little Fuzzy

    Little Fuzzy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I had Mallards when I was younger and they were noisy. Now I have chickens and my red sex links are noisy all day, one thinks she is a rooster, she gets up high and crows. When I yell at her to shut up she stops HAHA. I think she does it to get my attention. My White leghorns are only noisy for a minute right after they lay an egg. I love my EE girl she is very quiet doesn't even sing an egg song, neither did my Light Brahma, lost her last month for unknown reasons. Research the breeds for noise level.
     
  8. Leihamarie

    Leihamarie Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I happen to be pretty lucky since the area I live in is kind of busy traffic-wise so no one can hear them over the ambient noise during the day and they're all tucked in and quiet at night. If I lived in a quieter area I would do what @Teila mentioned and talk to my neighbors and share some eggs, lol! :)
     
  9. June2012

    June2012 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Last edited: Nov 18, 2016
  10. Teila

    Teila Bambrook Bantams Premium Member

    Howdy June2012

    This is what the garden looked like when we moved in:

    [​IMG]

    This is it now [the majority of the plants are potted]:

    [​IMG]

    This is the lawn, 3 years into having chickens:

    [​IMG]

    If all the chickens have is grass then they probably will dig it all up over time. If you can give them somewhere more interesting and exciting than just grass you might find they prefer to hang out there, rather than digging in the lawn. My gals definitely prefer to hang out in the shade, under the foliage, in their dirt bath etc [in the second picture] as opposed to scratching up the lawn.

    With a few potted plants you should be able to create an area that they might enjoy and the landlord would probably be pleased because it would make the garden look nicer.

    Also, I only have bantams. I have never had large breeds but I am thinking my little banties probably do less damage than their larger cousins. Also, in my experience, the feather footed breeds seem to do less damage than the non feathered ones.

    Yeah, sorry, by extras I meant wiggle room. For example if the lease says no pets but after you have lived there for a while and they see that the place is well taken care of and rent paid on time etc, they might change the lease to allow a pet. Landlords like to have a good tenant and may bend their rules a little to keep them.

    We also have two indoor cats [with an outdoor run] which are mentioned on the lease. Note: While both landlords were cool with the chickens, they are not mentioned on the lease.

    I had a Property Manager tell me once that she actually likes to put pet owners into property for a couple of reasons 1. They are generally more responsible and 2. They appreciate the fact that they have been allowed to have their pets and tend to care for the property better so that they are not kicked out, meaning they have to find somewhere else that will let them have pets [her words not mine].

    Wow, I have never encountered any issues with my neighbours expecting eggs which is a good thing because sometimes we barely get enough to scramble and feed back to the girls and have actually been known, during moult season and winter, to buy eggs to scramble and feed to the girls .. yeah, I know! [​IMG]

    When I broached the subject of chickens with my first Landlord, I explained our plans and the fact that we were sticking within our zoning guidelines and they were fine with it. As mentioned, we had been living here for a while and taking good care of the place, the current landlord purchased the property with us, the cats and the chickens in residence and again, they had no problem. I think the fact that we had been living here for a while and taking good care of the property went in our favour. If I was a landlord I would want to gauge how my tenants took care of the place before granting pets etc. With the neighbours, same thing really; we had lived here for a while and got to know the neighbours before we got the chickens. We pretty much keep to ourselves and are fairly quiet, no loud parties etc so when we mentioned to the neighbours we were getting chickens they were cool with it. Again, as I mentioned though, I did ask them to tell me if they had any issues [which they have not] and I still often ask them if the girls are annoying them at all to which I have never got a “Yes".

    Personally, I think being upfront and honest with both your Landlord and neighbours is the best bet.

    I also work from home. This is definitely a bonus for me. If the girls are making some noise for whatever reason I can go outside and suss it out or hush them.

    Yep, quiet neighbourhoods are not your friend if you want to keep chickens Luckily for us the Crows, Lorikeets, Butcher Birds, Cockatoos etc make way more early morning noise than the chickens and as mentioned, besides all the noise from their pets, cars and children, all of my neighbours are early morning people also, probably because of those previously mentioned birds lol [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Nov 18, 2016

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