Repost w/pictures Urgent, Very sick hen!

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by dmdhart, Aug 26, 2010.

  1. dmdhart

    dmdhart Chillin' With My Peeps

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    One of my red star hens (about 2 years old) is very sick. She has goop coming out of her eyes and nostrils. Her eyes are VERY swollen, the skin around them is very red, and she has lost feathers around her face and elsewhere on her body. There are no signs of mites. I have seperated her from the rest of the flock, have given her some Poly - vi- sol and water with vinegar in it. I have put neosporin in her eyes. She is not eating though. I have tried mixed bird seed, laying crumbles, scratch, rice crispies, cheerios, cooked rice, even scrambled eggs! I have duramycin on hand and am going to try to get some of that down her. I also have sulmet on hand. Would that be better to use?
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  2. Cloverleaf Farm

    Cloverleaf Farm Bearded Birds are Best

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    Oh, wow, poor baby! I don't know what's wrong with her, but I'd get her on some antibiotics right away...if you have a regular vet, see if they'll give her some baytril (you can give the injectible kind orally) at 15mg/kg twice a day for 14 days. If you don't have a vet that will give you baytril, start her on duramycin, you should be able to get that at the feed store. Good luck!!
     
  3. perolane

    perolane Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 20, 2010
    Louisiana
    Looks like coryza. Info below...so sorry.


    Infectious Coryza
    Synonyms: roup, cold, coryza

    Species affected: chickens, pheasants, and guinea fowl. Common in game chicken flocks.

    Clinical signs: Swelling around the face, foul smelling, thick, sticky discharge from the nostrils and eyes, labored breathing, and rales (rattles -- an abnormal breathing sound) are common clinical signs. The eyelids are irritated and may stick together. The birds may have diarrhea and growing birds may become stunted (see Table 1 ).

    Mortality from coryza is usually low, but infections can decrease egg production and increase the incidence and/or severity of other diseases. Mortality can be as high as 50 percent, but is usually no more than 20 percent. The clinical disease can last from a few days to 2-3 months, depending on the virulence of the pathogen and the existence of other infections such as mycoplasmosis.

    Transmission: Coryza is primarily transmitted by direct bird-to-bird contact. This can be from infected birds brought into the flock as well as from birds which recover from the disease which remain carriers of the organism and may shed intermittently throughout their lives.. Birds risk exposure at poultry shows, bird swaps, and live-bird sales. Inapparent infected adult birds added into a flock are a common source for outbreaks. Within a flock, inhalation of airborne respiratory droplets, and contamination of feed and/or water are common modes of spread.

    Treatment: Water soluble antibiotics or antibacterials can be used. Sulfadimethoxine (Albon[​IMG], Di-Methox™) is the preferred treatment. If it is not available, or not effective, sulfamethazine (Sulfa-Max[​IMG], SulfaSure™), erythromycin (gallimycin[​IMG]), or tetracycline (Aureomycin[​IMG]) can be used as alternative treatments. Sulfa drugs are not FDA approved for pullets older than 14 weeks of age or for commercial layer hens. While antibiotics can be effective in reducing clinical disease, they do not eliminate carrier birds.

    Prevention: Good management and sanitation are the best ways to avoid infectious coryza. Most outbreaks occur as a result of mixing flocks. All replacement birds on "coryza-endemic" farms should be vaccinated. The vaccine (Coryza-Vac) is administered subcutaneously (under the skin) on the back of the neck. Each chicken should be vaccinated four times, starting at 5 weeks of age with at least 4 weeks between injections. Vaccinate again at 10 months of age and twice yearly thereafter.
     
  4. dmdhart

    dmdhart Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thank you for that info. Though, it's kind of depressing. I ran out and started looking at all of my chickens (I have over 40) and noticed that a few of the other hens are starting to get the redish eye look! And I just day before yesterday let some of my older peeps out into the pen~[​IMG] At least I now know why my egg production has dropped so much!!!
     
  5. RedRoosterFarm

    RedRoosterFarm **LOVE MY SERAMAS**

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    yes Coryza. Nasty stuff. Weed out the good from the bad. I use injectable tylan and it works fast. I hope you can get rid of it without loss. If im not mistaken they will be carriers if they live. Best of luck!
     
  6. Sweetpeaswan

    Sweetpeaswan Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 5, 2010
    Perolane hit the nail on the head!!! Poor baby, hope she gets better soon!
     
  7. dmdhart

    dmdhart Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have started the back flock on Sulmet (which one of the articles said would get it) because I have the most of it. The one isolated hen I'm giving duramycin. My front flock (they live in my yard, vs the back chicken pen aren't showing any symptoms. Should I treat them anyway?
    Does this mean that any peeps that I sell from now on will be carriers?
    How many times a day should I give my sick girl poly-vi-sol? Since she is not willingly eating, how many times a day should I get duramycin down her (I can get her to drink things with a dropper)
     
  8. Cloverleaf Farm

    Cloverleaf Farm Bearded Birds are Best

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    Yes, if you have coryza in your flock, PLEASE do not sell birds to anyone else. If you really want to continue to sell birds, then you need to cull EVERY bird that shows symptoms, and make sure your flock is disease free for a very long time before you get any more or sell anything.
     
  9. dmdhart

    dmdhart Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Can the eggs from these chickens be a hazard to humans if consumed? If I hatch the eggs out in an incubator vs being with the mama's would that protect the chicks from catching it?
     

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