Rescued chicks. Cochins? Or something else?

Discussion in 'What Breed Or Gender is This?' started by Flock Leader, Nov 8, 2012.

  1. Flock Leader

    Flock Leader Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My neighbour got these chicks about a month ago, and I told her from the start, with all due respect, she must take better care of them if she wants them to survive. Today she called me and told one of the chicks died "unexpectedly"; when I asked why this might be she said "I, uh, forgot to give them food and water. Again." She added that they poop all over her front porch, and will I please take them because she can't find the motivation to take care of them.

    So... I knew I might be making a mistake, because:

    (a) We didn't plan on getting any new chicks until spring.
    (b) If one of them died, who knows, they might have a disease.
    (c) They are really flighty and seem to mistrust humans (can't blame them here). I like chickens who are tame at least to the extent you can handle them easily enough if need arises.

    But I felt I just couldn't let them stay where they were, and took them in. Needless to say, I'm housing them well apart from my other chickens.

    Which breed/sex/age are they? My neighbour told me they are cochins, but I don't know whether I can trust this information. I know the photos aren't great, it's already evening and I pulled them out of the coop to try and get a couple of shots. The lighter one (first photo) is larger than the others, even though they are all supposed to be the same age... looks like a boy, I think?

    You can't see it very well in the photos, but their feet are feathered.

    Any input will be much appreciated!
     
    Last edited: Nov 8, 2012
  2. Pele

    Pele Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Good for you for taking them in. They do appear to be cochins, but it's kind of hard to tell without seeing their feet more. The first one is definitely a roo.
     
  3. Flock Leader

    Flock Leader Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks! What about the colors? They just appear to be a mix of several colors, isn't that so? Also, any way to know if they're the large kind or bantam (except wait and see, obviously! [​IMG]). I'm pretty sure they could have been bigger by now if they had been fed properly.
     
  4. RainyChicks

    RainyChicks Out Of The Brooder

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    Maybe try comparing them to your other chickens to know what size they are.
     
  5. RainyChicks

    RainyChicks Out Of The Brooder

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    Well, they look like crossed breeds, but if not, the first one for sure is crossed. The white Rooster in the first picture is probably a Red Sex Link. Red Sex Links are all white when they are young, ( pullet/cockerel) and all brown when they reach full adult size. That is also one way to tell the age, how much brown the Red Sex Link has. Yours is only about 2-3 months old by color!

    The Sex Link, a crossed show quality breed, are brown egg layers. That breed is in the top three best egg layers in the world, alongside Leghorns and Rhode Island Reds. The Red Sex Link is a Brown/White bird; Crossed between either a New Hampshire or a Rhode Island Red Rooster, and anything white: White Rock, White Wyandotte, White Leghorn, etc.
    The Black Sex Link is a Black/Red bird. Full black with brown on chest and wings. Crossed between either a New Hampshire or a Rhode Island Red Rooster, and anything black: Black Australorp,
    etc.
    Hope this helps,
    RainyChicks
     
  6. Flock Leader

    Flock Leader Chillin' With My Peeps

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    That's what I would have done if I knew they were properly cared for, but they were not. My chickens, on the other hand... you'll be hard pressed to meet a more pampered crowd. They are nice, big and glossy-feathered. So, we'll see. I'll try to feed them up. They'll need it to survive the winter - although it generally doesn't snow where we live, it can get mighty cold, with icy rain.
     

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