RESCUED MEAT HEN..1 month old, when can I put her out in main coop?

Discussion in 'Meat Birds ETC' started by lisa new chickens, Nov 18, 2010.

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  1. lisa new chickens

    lisa new chickens Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 10, 2010
    I recued another meat hen delivered 1 month ago from next door. she was a hatchling and wondered in my yard on a rainy day. We have raised her in a big brooder with light and she is almost halfway feathered out. She loves the outdoors. I take her out for about an hour or 2 a day to get used to my other three Bantams. The temperature at night here is about 38 to 42 degrees. When can I put her out? Do I need a light?
     
  2. Lazy J Farms Feed & Hay

    Lazy J Farms Feed & Hay Chillin' With My Peeps

    If she was just hatched a month ago then she only has another 4 weeks until she is ready to butcher. Go ahead and let her out, the free range goodies might enhance ther flavor of the meat.

    Jim
     
  3. chickenlorena

    chickenlorena Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 23, 2010
    We rescued a meat bird 2 months ago. If you are planning on rasing her as a pet, let me know. I can let you know how to feed a broiler to increase their life span and quality of life.
     
    Last edited: Nov 18, 2010
  4. Olive Hill

    Olive Hill Overrun With Chickens

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    What did you "rescue" it from?
     
  5. chickenlorena

    chickenlorena Out Of The Brooder

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    She was found wandering by the highway very near an industrial poultry farm. She and another one (who had fallen of a truck, probably on their way to slaughter) were picked-up by animal control. Then I picked both of them up but the older one had to be put down after 5 days of being with us. She was waaayyy overweight, missing too many feathers and barely walking. She had a hard time breathing [​IMG] It's hard to believe humans breed these poor animals to the point that they are unable to walk or let alone reach breeding age. "Snow White", how my son named her, is doing fantastic but is under very control feeding schedule. She free ranges with our other hens so she gets plenty of excercise too!
     
  6. Omniskies

    Omniskies Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hey, all of mine are able to walk up until they go to freezer camp. I swear they would jump in the boiling water and put themselves in the bags if you promised them food out of it.

    I love heritage chickens, I really do, but I just can't give up Birdzillas. I consider them two different types of meat for the freezer.
     
  7. Omniskies

    Omniskies Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oh, and to answer your question, you may not be able to depending on the personality of your rescue bird and of the birds in your flock. I have raised Cornish-Rock to adulthood (it's ridiculously easy so long as they are forced to mostly free range) and found that they are extremely docile birds. Roosters discover pretty quickly that a Cornish-Rock hen isn't fast enough to outrun him (which, in the chicken world, means that the Cornish hen _really_ digs him - so much so that she doesn't even want to play hard to get). Regular hens will find out that when they're in a bad mood, Cornish hens are too slow to get out of the way of being pecked at. They become the barnyard punching bag.

    When I've had them in the past I've only kept them together while free ranging - never in an enclosed space where the Cornish can't escape (and can't hide - anything that rotund bottom will fit through will also fit any other hen you have). When they reach adulthood I'll keep them in a separate pen entirely. Usually until I get tired of feeding them and sell them off to make better use of the space.

    Please remember this is just my experience with adult Cornish-Rocks. Some birds are fine in a mixed flock and some mixed flocks will happily accept a Cornish-Rock. But when it comes down to it, these Birdzillas _are_ different and honestly look like they live a happier life when allowed to do nothing but eat and poop for a few months rather than be on a regular diet for years (can you blame them? Who wants to be on a never-ending diet when all you want is FOOD?).
     
  8. chickenlorena

    chickenlorena Out Of The Brooder

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    Thanks for the advice. Our is 4 months old already and so far she's getting along just fine with our other 3 hens. The other ones are smaller in size and very docile so I hope they coexist fine. The free range all day, only at night they are in the coop.
     
  9. Sillystunt

    Sillystunt Master of the Silly

    Jul 11, 2008
    Winter Haven, FL
    Quote:yes it is sad but that's what they are for. People want that fat white breasted chicken to cook for dinner. I got some to slaughter for food & totally chickened out. they kept staring at me like they knew i was gonna eat them....lol.

    i finally broke down & bought five more since i really want to control what my kids are putting in their bodies. still have a ways to go & my friends already have dibs on me chickening out again....lol

    but people say if you free range them they can live a little bit longer. [​IMG]
     
  10. lisa new chickens

    lisa new chickens Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 10, 2010
    UMMM.....I believe this was my post last night? Someone is answering for me? I rescued her from being put in the chickenhouse, she is now my pet. I want to keep her. Is getting cold here, and i am afraid to put her out in the coop until all her feathers come in. Is it ok to do it soon, do I need a light?
     
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