Residential Area - New to this

Discussion in 'New Member Introductions' started by kohnee87, Mar 13, 2015.

  1. kohnee87

    kohnee87 New Egg

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    Mar 13, 2015
    Hi,
    We live in a residential area and would like to know what to expect or if you have any tips. I read that chicken attract rats and mice and I am afraid this will cause a problem with our neighbors. How can we avoid this from happening?[​IMG]
     
  2. Kelsie2290

    Kelsie2290 True BYC Addict Premium Member

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    Hello :frow and Welcome To BYC!
    You might like to check out the BYC Learning Center, lots of good articles on all aspects of chicken keeping you'll find helpful. https://www.backyardchickens.com/atype/1/Learning_Center And it is always fun to check out your state thread for chicken keeping neighbors and what they recommend for your area https://www.backyardchickens.com/t/270925/find-your-states-thread

    You might like to check out the Pest forum https://www.backyardchickens.com/f/13/predators-and-pests
    It is not so much chickens attract rats and mice, as their food and sometimes coop does (the rodents find shelter there), but it is really about the same as the average outdoor dog house and pen setup where they are fed outside. You can pick or cover the food up at night (most rodents are active at night), use feeders or methods of feeding that exclude rodents (ie treadle feeders). Make sure to keep areas clear around and in the coop so rodents don't have places to hide, a lot of people like to either have their coop raised up off the ground to keep things from living under it and to make it easier to clean, or have a solid foundation and use lots of hardware cloth (good idea for predator proofing anyhow). It's a good idea to keep mouse/rat traps/bait out in general anyhow, even if you don't have a rodent problem... there will be animals migrating around, and it is easier to keep a problem from getting started than to try and tackle an established one.
     
    1 person likes this.
  3. Wyandottes7

    Wyandottes7 Overrun With Chickens

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    Welcome to BYC! [​IMG]I'm glad you joined our community.

    Kelsie2290's given you some good advice.Be sure to store feed in metal, mice-proof containers like metal garbage cans to prevent them from eating all the feed.
     
  4. mymilliefleur

    mymilliefleur Keeper of the Flock

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    Hello and Welcome to BYC! [​IMG]I'm glad you decided to join! Let us know if you have any questions, we will be glad to help you if we can. [​IMG] There is a lot of great info on here, and lots of very knowledgeable people, so I'm sure you'll be able to find any info you may be looking for. [​IMG] I agree with what Kelsie2290 said.
     
  5. ScenicViews

    ScenicViews Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Welcome!! I am glad you joined!!

    You will definitely be able to find any and all information here! I have learned so much !

    [​IMG]
     
  6. BantamFan4Life

    BantamFan4Life LOOK WHAT YOU MADE ME DO. Premium Member

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    My Coop
    Welcome to BYC! I'm glad you joined us!
     
  7. Chicken Girl1

    Chicken Girl1 November....... my favorite month Premium Member

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    Hello [​IMG]and Welcome to BYC![​IMG]
    Glad to have you join! Feel free to make yourself at home!
     
  8. Mountain Peeps

    Mountain Peeps Change is inevitable, like the seasons Premium Member

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    Welcome to BYC! Please make yourself at home and we are here to help.

    I agree with @Kelsie2290
     
  9. drumstick diva

    drumstick diva Still crazy after all these years. Premium Member

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    Out to pasture
    Please be certain if you use traps, bait, etc. to have them out of reach of your chickens. Poison can affect them even if they just eat a poisoned rodent.
     

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