Respiratory Illness. Help.

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by FurAndFeathers, Nov 11, 2014.

  1. FurAndFeathers

    FurAndFeathers Out Of The Brooder

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    May 16, 2014
    The Dalles, Oregon
    I picked up two pullets from different sellers at a poultry show. One was infested with lice. One was fine. However, since they were brought home together, they've been in quarantine together. The lice issue has been resolved, but now they are both showing symptoms of a respiratory issue. One only sneezes and is otherwise doing fine. The other is really struggling, and I sincerely thought I was going to lose her this weekend. She sneezes, had watery eyes and rattles when she breathes and was really lethargic. There wasn't any puffiness in her eyes, or her joints. I've had her on Oxytetracycline for three days, and while she is no longer lethargic, the rattling in her breathing has worsened. I have them in a warm room and have been providing ACV in their water along with electrolytes. I don't seem to have access to a poultry-aware vet close to where I live. I'm concerned about making the 90-minute drive each way to reach one, causing them more stress, to have them looked at and tested. I'm hoping someone here can provide some thoughtful insight to help this chicken newbie get these girls better, as well as providing an opinion as to whether or not to integrate these girls with my healthy existing flock when (if) they get better. This was my first experience at a chicken show, and purchasing anything older than day-old chicks. So far, it's been a lesson in frustration and sadness.
     
  2. jillysgrammy

    jillysgrammy New Egg

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    Nov 10, 2014
    My vet gave me some good advice. Don't buy chicks from pet stores or other hobby farms. You are. buying different types of farm bacteria sand diseases.
    Only buy them from professional hatcheries. I will use Murray McMurray in Iowa in the future. They will ship as few as one or many if you choose.
    Good advice to avoid bird health problems and heartaches when we lose one.
     
  3. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    Jacksonville, Florida
    DO NOT integrate those two sick birds into your healthy flock even if they get healthy. Take my advice and cull those two birds immediately and either incinerate them or bury them deep in the ground far away from your existing flock. Then go DIRECTLY in your house and throw your clothes in the washing machine and sanitize your shoes, then take a shower. You wont regret it! Practice biosecurity.
     
    1 person likes this.
  4. cafarmgirl

    cafarmgirl Overrun With Chickens

    X2. Even if these birds recover they will be carriers of whatever disease this is, you do NOT want to integrate these birds into your flock! Make sure you are not going out to your other flock after caring for these birds, you should always take care of them last, then change clothes, shoes and shower. That is how easily some of this stuff can spread and once it is in your flock it's pretty much there to stay until you depopulate and start over, it's a real pain in the backside. This is also a good reason not to buy birds at shows, swaps, auctions etc.
     
  5. FurAndFeathers

    FurAndFeathers Out Of The Brooder

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    May 16, 2014
    The Dalles, Oregon
    I normally wouldn't have purchased birds from other sources, but I felt this particular show would be a trustworthy place. I was wrong. I would like to have them tested for MG before I fully decide to cull them. I have been following strict quarantine with clothing, shoes, shower, order of caring for birds, separate food and water sources, etc... This is just so heartbreaking. These two birds are super sweet, and I was looking forward to having a couple of less common breeds in my flock.
     
  6. hammytammy

    hammytammy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 23, 2014
    Windsor NY
    best advice you will ever get.
     
  7. jillysgrammy

    jillysgrammy New Egg

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    Nov 10, 2014
    To Georgia dawg,

    My vet treats all types of exotic animals, birds as well as dogs and cats.
    He gave my chicken an injection-don't know what it was. He also
    gave me a liquid to give her that is usually not used in chickens because
    they are a meat source. I assured him she is a pet and we will never
    eat her. He also said not to eat the eggs for three weeks. He has it because he treats
    fancy parrots, macaws etc. Anyway the Medication: Baytril Suspension 50mg/per.cc
    Give 1cc once a day for 9 days. He gave one dose in her beak while I was there to
    show me how,to do that. Just hold her and with thumb and index finger gently
    open the beak and inject the one cc of fluid. He had given me a 3cc syringe.
    no needle needed. You may be able to get one at a pharmacy.
    I do not know if you can get the medication at a vet supply or if you need a
    prescription. With this information, you may be able to get your vet to get it for you.
    Super good news, My hen is completely well. So with the dose he gave her, it was a total
    of 10 days. They mixed the suspension so your vet or pharmacist may need to mix it.
    Hope you can get it as it really,worked for my hen. It cost me for visit,med and stool,for
    worms (negative) plus vet services, $151.00. Amazing what we are willing to pay
    to care for our pets. Hope you can get the medication and it will work for you.
     
  8. jillysgrammy

    jillysgrammy New Egg

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    Nov 10, 2014
    Georgia dawg,
    Vet also told me to separate her from the others and to keep her warm. She is still in the little
    dogs crate in my utility room. She is a big black Cochin, the sweetest breed.
     
  9. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    Nov 27, 2008
    Jacksonville, Florida
    I know all about Baytril and other meds to treat sick birds with respiratory diseases. These medicines including baytril "mask" symptoms, they WILL NOT CURE whatever respiratory disease(s) birds have. Birds that survive these diseases are carriers for life, there are very few exceptions...fowl pox come to mind.
    Your bird WILL relapse showing symptoms at some point in the future when stressed.
    If your vet didnt explain all this to you, he performed a disservice failing to provide you this information, not to mention the $$$ you spent!
    Read through this link which explains it all in plain english:
    http://www.gapoultrylab.org/wp-cont...coplasma handout for Backyard Flocks 4-12.pdf
     
    Last edited: Nov 12, 2014
  10. cafarmgirl

    cafarmgirl Overrun With Chickens

    X2. Antibiotic's only treat the symptoms and can help prevent secondary bacterial infections and pneumonia. They don't cure the bird of the disease. I have found that even avian and exotic's vets, who really should know better, often are very poorly versed in poultry respiratory diseases. What applies to parrots and other pet birds does not always apply to poultry.

    jillysgrammy: also be aware that, in regards to Baytril, the issue is not only whether you use the bird for meat, it's the eggs as well. Use of Baytril in poultry can cause the possibility that the bird and it's meat/eggs may carry a Cipro resistant strain of campylobactor. Cipro is the main antibiotic used to treat campylobactor in humans. That is why Baytril is banned for use in meat/egg producing chickens. Some people use it and still eat the eggs, just something to be aware of so you can make your own choice.
     

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