Respiratory issue-swollen eyes and sinuses Help ASAP

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by KDailey, Aug 15, 2011.

  1. KDailey

    KDailey Crazy Cochin Lady

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    My favorite little pullet has a respiratory issue and her sinuses are swelled up so much that her eyes are swelled shut. I'm getting her some Tylan 50 today when i get off work, I put electrolytes in her water, gave her a dish of medicated feed and I've got her in the house to watch her.

    My question is: Does the Tylan 50 have to be injected or can I give it by mouth. I'm not a real big fan of needles so if there's an alternative I'd much rather do that. But if it has to be injected, where exactly do I inject and how long of a needle?
     
  2. Cochin378

    Cochin378 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    it might be Infectious Coryza, Infectious Bronchitis, a CRD, or perhaps some other form of respiratory distress including bacterial, fungal, or viral infection.
    This is some information I copied for you off another website.

    Coryza (previously known as things like a cold or roup) is caused by bacteria called Heamophilus paragallinarum, which primarily attacks the upper respiratory system, including the nasal passages. Swelling of the face, wheezing, sneezing, nasal discharge, conjunctivitis (including ‘bubbles’ at the corner of the eye), eyes glued shut, and open-mouth breathing are some of the more common symptoms. And they may appear singly or in various combinations. But the most telltale symptom is the unmistakable odor that is generated from the nasal discharge. Once you’ve smelled this odor, you’ll identify it every time. Additional symptoms unrelated to breathing can be a drop in production, reduction in fertility, diarrhea, and a decrease in water consumption. Although not as common, if rales are detected, then it is safe to assume that the lower respiratory tract is involved as well.

    Coryza can be chronic in nature or acute, and youngsters tend to suffer from less severe cases than the adults. The acute cases are spread rapidly and death can occur within hours to days of the first symptoms. The incubation period is from 24 to 48 hours, which is considered relatively short. The chronic disease can last a lifetime in your flock, passing from one bird to the other until your entire flock has been exposed. Once a flock has been exposed to Coryza, survivors are considered reservoirs of infection (carriers), whether they had outward physical symptoms or not.

    Coryza does not pass vertically to the egg. However, its transmission to the rest of the flock is widespread and thorough through a host of ways. One way is through contaminated drinking water. Once an infected bird drinks from a community drinking trough, it leaves behind the bacteria through its nasal discharge. Water also becomes contaminated by feces that end up in the water and also through the dust in the air that contains bacteria and settles into the water.

    Another means of spreading is done through the feed source. The same rules apply here that I’ve mentioned about the drinking water.

    Simple contact with other birds and the aerosol droplets of bacteria in the air caused by infected birds are also a common means of transmission of the disease.

    You should not vaccinate against Coryza unless you know you already have it in your flock. Treatment is somewhat effective in chronic cases using a host of easily obtainable antibiotics. Erythromycin and oxytetracycline (Terramycin) are two listed in Veterinary texts. However, Coryza is also becoming somewhat resistant to some of these drugs and reinfection sometimes occurs after treatment is stopped. I understand that Baytril (enrofloxicin) is very effective against Coryza, but as most of you know, is difficult to get and expensive. However, if you build a good working relationship with your local Vet, he may be a source for the drug. Also, some poultry supply houses do sell the water-soluble liquid for poultry, if you look around.

    I’d like to make a note here about injectables. It is my belief that in general, water-soluble antibiotics used to treat the drinking water are usually not as effective. The reason for this is because (especially in the case of Coryza), sick birds are usually off of feed and water anyway, and they’re the ones who need it the most. If you just can’t bear the thought of an injection, then consider using the drenching method to medicate. This would involve squirting the proper dose of medication right down the bird’s throat using a syringe without a needle.

    H. paragallinarum (the Coryza-causing bacteria) is fragile and easily destroyed by disinfection. Prevention of the disease is relatively safe and easy with the use of a disinfectant such as Oxine. Fogging the coop on a routine preventive maintenance schedule and treating the community drinking water with 7 drops of Oxine per gallon of water would help discourage the incidence and spread of Coryza. (Oxine is EPA approved for the use in the drinking water of all poultry and livestock.) Although not mentioned often, I have found some reference to the possibility of air-borne introduction of the bacterium into the environment.
    Unfortunately, many times in a case of Coryza, there exists a secondary issue of M. gallisepticum (MG), which can affect the outcome of recovery. Baytril is now being thought of in some circles as a virtual miracle cure for MG, and therefore, my treatment of choice. In theory, it would effectively eliminate both problems simultaneously.


    You want a small needle like a 22 gage. you inject it into the chickens breast muscle.
     
  3. zookeeper15133

    zookeeper15133 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You can also use the drench method. Take it up in the syringe with the needle, then remove the needle and squirt it in her mouth. I do this with my turkeys.
     
  4. Katy

    Katy Flock Mistress

    Keep in mind that if it's viral no antibiotics will really cure it.....it may mask the symptoms is all. If you've recently brought in any new birds you may have introduced something into your flock.
     
  5. KDailey

    KDailey Crazy Cochin Lady

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    I've recently gotten new birds but before I brought them in her nose was slightly runny for about two days, then quit, she was showing no symptoms and then yesterday morning I came out and she was like this. She's not acting too bad but I want to get somethin in her before it does get bad.

    These are my first birds and I got them as chicks from Ideal and from my neighbor who hatches them in her house and then keeps the brooder in the house so they weren't around any other birds before coming to me.
     
  6. KDailey

    KDailey Crazy Cochin Lady

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    How often am I supposed to give her the Tylan (by mouth)? Is it the same if I inject her?

    My boyfriend was going to inject her last night since I'm not fond of needles but when we were feeling her breast, she's so young that she doesn't have much muscle there. Plus she hasn't been eating well since she got sick and is losing weight. Is it going to hurt her if he injects in the breast even if there's not much there?

    The needle is about this long -------- give or take a dash.
     
  7. zookeeper15133

    zookeeper15133 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Tylan is a very painful injection. It also causes irreparable tissue damage where it is injected. That's why I give it orally. Same dosage, same amount of time.
     
  8. KDailey

    KDailey Crazy Cochin Lady

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    I've been giving her 1 cc orally. She's a little under two months old. But how often am I supposed to give it to her? I've been givin it to her once a day (two days). I also heard that it helps to wipe a little across her eyes?

    Speaking of eyes, she kinda tried to open her eyelid last night and it was white underneath?? Should I be doing something to her eyes?
     
  9. KDailey

    KDailey Crazy Cochin Lady

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    Bronson, Tx
    Just an update: My poor girl died in the middle of the night last night. In a way I was glad because she really didn't look good at all and didn't seem to have any fight in her. I was debating putting her down but really didn't want to have to make that decision.

    RIP: Lola
     

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