Results of buff orp rooster over lav orp hen?

funkeke

In the Brooder
Sep 28, 2021
7
7
14
I'm new to chicken genetics and trying to learn. I'm curious about an unusual pairing. We received 4 Orpington eggs from a friend from a buff Orpington rooster over a lavender Orpington hen. I believe the hen was cuckoo barred. I say "I believe" because I can't quite confirm it from the photos I have of her--lav cuckoo seems pretty subtle. But based on how her male offspring came out, I think she must be cuckoo.

Here's a couple pics of the parents (best I've got):

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daddy-n-mama-orps.jpg


Our eggs hatched as two males and two females. Both males turned out to be black with barring and a lot of white, with some random scattered buff feathers. I'm not sure if their barring is considered cuckoo; they still have their adolescent feathers that grew pretty fast which would affect the barring. The females both turned out black and red, with primarily black head and tails. One female is quite dilute and one not dilute at all.

The two cockerels, aged 12 weeks, Isaac (whiter neck) and Shepard below. Basically two peas in a pod.

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The two pullets, also aged 12 weeks, Morrigan (dilute) and Spooky (not-dilute) below. Spooky has almost entirely deep black tail and head, whereas on Morrigan the red color is spread out much more. They both have a very similar neck/ruff in color and intensity.

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I would like to know how to classify these chicken patterns/colors. Also, if I were to breed two of these chickens back to each other, what kind of results could I expect? I believe I could get black, black barred, lav, lav barred, and possibly something mostly red, like buff or lemon (less clear on this). I'm not sure what the percentage chance of each phenotype would be.
 

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ve

Crowing
12 Years
Jan 27, 2009
1,951
148
296
Palmetto GA
I will guess that the hen carry E-black and Er - birchen. This shows in the girls. The light one is typical single copy birchen and wheaten, with added columbian and dark brown.
The other girl is E-extended black and wheaten, with added columbian and Db ( dark brown). Understandably they carry Di diluters and other genes.
The boys appear Silver Birchen.
 

funkeke

In the Brooder
Sep 28, 2021
7
7
14
Thank you for the info! If both boys are silver birchen, is there a genetic reason to explain why one has a whiter neck? Or is it just a simple difference between individual birds?
 

nicalandia

Free Ranging
12 Years
Jul 16, 2009
8,811
4,325
506
Stuck In a Dream
My Coop
My Coop
I will guess that the hen carry E-black and Er - birchen. This shows in the girls. The light one is typical single copy birchen and wheaten, with added columbian and dark brown.
The other girl is E-extended black and wheaten, with added columbian and Db ( dark brown). Understandably they carry Di diluters and other genes.
The boys appear Silver Birchen.
He is actually E/E extended black homozygote, but the F1s are E/eWh Co/co+ that combination gives rise to Pseudo Birchen looking birds
 

funkeke

In the Brooder
Sep 28, 2021
7
7
14
He is actually E/E extended black homozygote
Are you referring to daddy buff? Wouldn't that make him... black? I've read that the buff phenotype isn't fully understood, so it is possible for a buff to be E/E but still appear buff?
 

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