Results of different color Orpington mixes?

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by katelk, Feb 17, 2014.

  1. katelk

    katelk Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 6, 2013
    White Bluff, TN
    I have buff, lavender, blue, black, and chocolate Orpingtons. My roo is black with the chocolate gene.
    I was just curious what the coloring results would be of mixing this roo and all these different color ladies?
    Also, my blues have nicely defined lacing, is that strictly a blue Orp trait, or is it possible to get some degree of lacing in different colors?

    Thanks!
     
  2. Egghead_Jr

    Egghead_Jr Overrun With Chickens

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    You'll end up with a lot of black chickens, a few blacks will be lavender split (you'll not know which unless you separate eggs and tag the chicks) and the offspring of buff will have buff leakage. Some blue and some chocolate chickens as well, everything being equal from 5 mothers it would be 1 in 10 chicks blue and 1 in 10 chocolate.
     
  3. france4862

    france4862 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oct 29, 2013
    Richfield Wisconsin
    I got rid of my rooster today the hen house was quiet less clucking and chattering.
     
  4. katelk

    katelk Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 6, 2013
    White Bluff, TN

    So definitely need 2 lavenders to make lavender chicks. I know lav is a washout of black so I would have to keep careful track of the splits, which if bred would get some lavender. Correct?

    Also, I read that the chocolate gene is a female gene in splits. Just between my black hen and my split roo, does this mean I will get chocolate females and black males? Or would I need to breed a generation out for that?
    Or it will just always be some black and some chocolate?
     
  5. Egghead_Jr

    Egghead_Jr Overrun With Chickens

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    I don't know anything about Chocolate...think it's same as lavender gene. You'll get splits then half of color and you stick to it keeping notes of who begot whom.
     
  6. Egghead_Jr

    Egghead_Jr Overrun With Chickens

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    Yes. You need to hatch them seperate and tag them to know. Your majority hatch will be black. Your sire rooster is not split for lavender, as I read your post.

    If Lav is your desire then mark those birds and in next year mating you'll have 50% lavender.

    Edit to add: 50% Lavender from those birds you marked.
     
    Last edited: Feb 17, 2014

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