1. The Freckled Hen

    The Freckled Hen Out Of The Brooder

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    Jul 30, 2010
    Home Sweet Home
    I'm thinking of Rhino Lining the inside of my coop and wanted to know if there would be any negatives to that. The fumes will be all aired out (not putting up sides until a couple days after lining) before the chickens go in. I plan to put the bedding on top of the lined interior.. just thought rhino lining would make for easier cleaning later. Thanks for any advice you have [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2010
  2. kiwiegg

    kiwiegg Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 7, 2009
    Minnesota
    It's seems very practical to me. The only question I would have is how much scrubbing would be needed between the linings grooves (it does have the big grooves right?)
     
  3. bburn

    bburn Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 9, 2010
    Delaware, Arkansas
    We used an entire truck bed liner for the brooder when we broght the chicks home. My DH just put two 2x10 up at the end and screwed them in. Then he built a frame with chicken wire in it and attached it to the top.

    When the day came to move them out to the new coop and run.....before we completely closed it in...we all carried it out there. (yes, I did ask him how we were going to get it back out and yes it is still in there) Even though it is still in the run it provides endless entertainment for the chickens. They all get on top of it and survey their world. Inside all the stuff that built up is good pecking material. When I throw BOSS in the pen I always aim at the brooder and they hunt and peck for hours in there. The run is covered and I question how we could ever use it again....he says we just take the top off and lift it out....I say that will take about 8 people.

    But, I got lost here. There are grooves in it and it does collect stuff and inside the coop it might be a little hard to clean it out. Just sayin'

    But.....I have wondered about those horse stall mats they sell at TSC....have looked at them several times. Anyone use those?
     
  4. TK421

    TK421 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 24, 2010
    Central TX
    Rhino lining is not grooved. It's a rough-ish surface that can be sprayed clean. I'm assuming you want it so that you can spray down your coop periodically. I think it would really depend on what you're applying the Rhino Liner to. Wood could rot, and concrete wouldn't need the lining. Can you elaborate?
     
  5. The Freckled Hen

    The Freckled Hen Out Of The Brooder

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    Jul 30, 2010
    Home Sweet Home
    I will be lining the inside of the coop which is all pressure treated wood and is raised about 2ft off the ground. And you're correct, it's so I can periodically spray the whole thing down.. we were going to put a drain plug in (like in a boat) for when I do the cleaning.
     
  6. knjinnm

    knjinnm Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oct 5, 2010
    Sandia Park, NM
    Quote:Hi,
    The spray on bed liners I've seen are rough, a better solution would be a couple of other Rhino products (http://www.rhinolinings.com/) Rhino Epoxy and Rhino Home Pro. I did a quick read of Rhino's web page and did not find mention of applying the product to wood, what have you determined?
     
  7. The Freckled Hen

    The Freckled Hen Out Of The Brooder

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    Jul 30, 2010
    Home Sweet Home
    Quote:We bought a paint on do-it-yourself liner and went ahead and put it on just now (it had to be done today or not at all [​IMG] ) So far it's stuck to the wood just fine and I think it will be a good solution to sort of seal things up and to make for easier cleaning down the road.... at least I HOPE it does [​IMG]
     
  8. Cargo

    Cargo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 28, 2010
    Farmington, NM
    Great, keep us posted!

    [​IMG]
     
  9. gryeyes

    gryeyes Covered in Pet Hair & Feathers

    I put a horse stall mat in my coop on top of the plywood floor. And plenty of pine shavings bedding on top of it. MY thought was not only the waterproof nature of the stall mat but the slight protection for heavy landings. You know, when a heavy chicken lands on it from a jump off the roost.

    The pine shavings provide plenty of soft landing surface, so it's probably not necessary, but I was happy with the purchase. It was 4x6 and the coop is 4x8, so I only had 2 feet by 4 feet of floor space that needed the last scrap of linoleum - probably vinyl - flooring to cover it. Because the coop, once constructed, is actually just a tad shy of 4 ft wide, the stall mat curves up at the walls, which I think helps keep any wetness from seeping over the edge and onto the floor.

    It sure was nice to kneel upon when I was constructing the coop, though. [​IMG]
     
  10. The Freckled Hen

    The Freckled Hen Out Of The Brooder

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    Jul 30, 2010
    Home Sweet Home
    We ended up rhino lining about half way up form the bottom and then painted the rest with a black gloss exterior paint to even things out. Here are a few pictures...

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    It's just a thin coat and it went on pretty easily. I must say I'm happy with the way it turned out and how it sort of sealed things up. I wasn't planning on having an all black interior, but oh well! [​IMG] I'm just hoping that the first time I do a major cleaning it will hold tight while I spray it down. [​IMG]
     

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