Rhode Island Red hen attacked by neighbors dog

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by kycklingmamma, Dec 15, 2010.

  1. kycklingmamma

    kycklingmamma Chillin' With My Peeps

    I have a RiR hen that got attacked by a dog today. She is pretty bad off..not much for skin/feathers left on her neck..just flesh, she almost looks like a nakedneck chicken...also got an area above her tail feathers that are raw/fleshy.
    What chance do you think she have in recouperating? I have cleaned her off, sprayed the areas with antibiotic spray (human kind), wrapped her neck in gauze and tape and also cleaned the wounded area above her tail feathers..I also gave her some kids tylenol..in lack of knowing what else to give her..If you all feel she has no chance in surviving then we want to put her out of her pain and actually help her cross the rainbow bridge, but if not, I will fight for her and tend as best I can on my own. Please give me your honest opinion.

    Thanks, Petra
     
  2. chkn

    chkn Chillin' With My Peeps

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    There's been some threads here about torn flesh and organs showing but the chickens recuperated. See if you can find some. I believe rinsing the wounds with saline solution, treat with a gentle antiseptic and some polysporin and dress the wounds. Keep them clean and change the dressing. Keep the hen in a calm, quiet, comfortable place. Add some supplements. I was surprised, these survivors not only got the skin back but feathered up also. Listen, if she's still alive, that's a great sign. Keep her warm and comfy. Shock is your biggest enemy. Also, of course, infection, maybe someone can recommend some antibiotics. I'd get her started on whatever you have.
     
  3. noodleroo

    noodleroo Snuggles with Chickens

    Apr 29, 2010
    Rockport, Tx
    Keep her clean and dry and warm. In the house in a pet carrier would be good. The way they heal from these wounds is amazing. I'll keep good thoughts for you...
     
  4. chkn

    chkn Chillin' With My Peeps

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  5. kycklingmamma

    kycklingmamma Chillin' With My Peeps

    Thanks guys..she is already inside in a pet carrier..with a towel draped over to make it darker..Should I get Blue-kote, I saw that on another thread, or just keep on doing antispetic ointment and such? I hope she will recouperate

    I like the idea of a tshirt from the link..I will try to use something like that for her neck area. I do have tylan 50 on hand as well as variable water soluble antibiotics..should I try any of those?

    Thanks, Petra
     
  6. kycklingmamma

    kycklingmamma Chillin' With My Peeps

    Just an update..she is holding her own, eating and just hanging out in the carrier in my livingroom.
    I sprayed her with Blu-kote and started giving her anitibiotics in her water daily. Feeding her lots of treats, like boiled eggs, grapes, mac&cheese and of course reg. feed and scratch. I "smell" her wounds daily ( I know, maybe gross, but it seems to be the only way I can tell if infection is coming on since she is now dyed blue/purple from the spray) daily and so far she smells fresh unlike what I thought chickens might smell like..
    She is fighting hard for her life and is not willing to go...yet. Trooper girl.
     
  7. Miss Lydia

    Miss Lydia Running over with Blessings Premium Member

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    Sounds like your doing a great job. I am pulling for her and hope to hear soon that she back with her friends and going strong:[​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Dec 18, 2010
  8. Judy

    Judy Moderator Staff Member

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    South Georgia
    Good for you, and good for her.

    Nurse here: I firmly believe that what heals wounds, besides the patient himself, is primarily good nursing care. It's not that significant what you use, it's the attention to wounds and to the patient, how they feel, nutrition, all that. I've seen so many different products used topically over the years that it's staggering.

    Doesn't seem at all odd to me that you sniff the wounds. I would too if they had BluKote on them.

    Just FYI, BluKote is an old timey topical remedy, a bit of a disinfectant, so is fine for wounds. Neosporin would also have been fine. People actually use BluKote more as a way to stop the others from pecking. If she gets well enough that you think she can go back with the flock, and there are any bald spots at all, do spray her well then.

    You'll also have the problem that she will be at the bottom of the pecking order. It would be good to shake that up a bit. Maybe bring one "nice" hen in with her for a day or so. Maybe take the top hen out then put the injured one in. Something.

    I don't know how safe Tylenol is for chickens. It's quite dangerous for dogs and/or cats, I forget which, maybe both. Aspirin is safe; dose is one baby aspirin. Not that she necessarily needs it at this point.
     
  9. kycklingmamma

    kycklingmamma Chillin' With My Peeps

    Thanks guys for your encouraging words..I will not let her go easily and I think she knows this..she is totally fine with me inspecting her and all..
    I haven't given her anymore tylenol..just that initial day, I think more for me than for her..in lack of knowing what else to do for her kind of thing.
    I have not recoated her with Blu-kote but will do that tonight I think..do you think it is necessary? or should i move onto neosporin instead? Since she is in her own crate and staining is not a concern of mine it doesn't matter to me what to use..just want to use the "best".
    I will coat her once it is her turn to go outside, but I think I will wait for a while for that to happen.
     
  10. Judy

    Judy Moderator Staff Member

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    Quote:You've probably already done it, but anyway, my personal choice is Neosporin, for the simple reason that it takes the sting out of my own little cuts and scrapes, and I don't know whether BluKote would. BluKote might actually be a better choice, though, as it is a disinfectant which means it will reduce the numbers of any germs present, whereas Neosporin is antibiotics and therefore effective only against certain germs. Of course Neosporin, by killing common skin germs, will get the population down enough to let the body kick in with its own natural defenses.

    You see what I mean about, it's the care, in the end.
     

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