Rhode Island Red is laying mutant eggs?!

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by James Gielow, Jan 13, 2015.

  1. James Gielow

    James Gielow Out Of The Brooder

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    Hello friends,

    My RIR just began laying about 3 weeks ago. She started off with a few small ones, which I expected. Then she began getting normal sized pretty ones. The last week all of them have been either misshapen or simply cracked. Sometimes both.

    Any ideas as to what's causing this? My Easter Egger is laying beautiful, thick shelled eggs, so I don't think it's a lack of nutrients available as they all eat the same food.

    Should I be concerned or just give her time to get the "factory" up and running? Thanks in advance for your tips!

    Yours,
    James


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    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 14, 2015
  2. James Gielow

    James Gielow Out Of The Brooder

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    Oh, I should also add that the shells with the RIR are super thin and fragile.

    The thought did cross my mind that the other layer is simply crushing them in the box. But that wouldn't explain the oddly shaped eggs.
     
  3. sourland

    sourland Broody Magician Premium Member

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    I think she will eventually iron things out. As you have surmised it sometimes takes a while to get the 'assembly line' up and running. The fact that the other hen is fine indicates that the problem is not in your husbandry practices.
     
  4. sourland

    sourland Broody Magician Premium Member

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    Out of curiosity what are you feeding them?
     
  5. James Gielow

    James Gielow Out Of The Brooder

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    Thanks for the confirmation, I needed that. I'm giving them non organic layer pellets as the main dish. They also get veggie scraps from the garden. I give them the occasional weeds that I pick in the yard, but only the field greens just in case there's anything toxic that I don't know about.
     
  6. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    Might want to offer oyster shell in a separate container.
    Not all birds can absorb nutrients as efficiently as others, but hopefully it's just start up glitches.

    Where do you live that you have garden scraps this time of year??(she said jealously from -10F Michigan)
    You also may be reducing their protein intake with the veggies, layer feed is usually bare minimum in protein.
     
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  7. James Gielow

    James Gielow Out Of The Brooder

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    Dear aart,

    Great tip! I will look into oyster shells! I'm assuming it's for adding calcium to the diet to aid in a stronger shell? Is protein present in the shells as well? If not, any recommendations on adding protein supplements? Perhaps I can feed her back her mutant eggs in a scrambled form. Although, that seems wrong on many levels :)

    I'm in San Diego so things grow just about all year round. We get rains like you get snow and that means weeds go crazy around now. No rest for the gardener here. If it helps, I am originally from Buffalo, NY so I've done my time in the snow and cold!!

    thanks again for your help!

    yours,
    James
     
  8. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    Protein helps with over all nutritive health and thus a healthy reproductive system, no protein in the shell that I know of.

    Look at the label on your layer feed, it should list the protein level...usually 16-18% in layer feeds. If you're feeding lots of veggie scraps it the volume could be diluting the protein in the layer feed.

    I like to feed an 'all flock' 20% protein crumble to all ages and genders, as non-layers(chicks, males and all molting birds) do not need the extra calcium that is in layer feed and chicks and molters can use the extra protein. Makes life much simpler to store and distribute one type of chow that everyone can eat and have calcium available at all times for the layers, oyster shell mixed with rinsed, dried, crushed chicken egg shells in a separate container.
    The higher protein crumble offsets the 8% protein scratch grains and other kitchen/garden scraps I like to offer.
     
  9. James Gielow

    James Gielow Out Of The Brooder

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    I like that idea! It covers all the bases. I do feed them GIANT grubs from my compost bin at least once a week. Those are loaded with proteins. When I get home, I'll check out the label and see what the ratios are. I'm a newbie, so I'm still on a learning curve.

    Thanks again!
     

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