ringneck dove pair for outdoor aviary

Discussion in 'Pigeons and Doves' started by sparklechicken, Jan 26, 2011.

  1. sparklechicken

    sparklechicken Out Of The Brooder

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    Dec 8, 2010
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    I just moved into a house that has an outdoor aviary, so I bought my husband a pair of ringneck doves for his birthday! Since it's the middle of January, I hear that I need to climatize the doves before they can stay outside. Does anyone know if I can speed up the process? I have an indoor cage, but I feel they'd be much happier in the big aviary. Maybe start out with them in the garage? Any ideas will help. Thanks!
     
  2. sparklechicken

    sparklechicken Out Of The Brooder

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    Dec 8, 2010
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    Oh, maybe I should add that I live in Paso Robles, Ca. This is usda zone 8b, and this winter we've had light frosts on some mornings!
     
  3. Mary Of Exeter

    Mary Of Exeter Chillin' With My Peeps

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    What conditions were the doves kept in before? You may not have to climatize them.
     
  4. sparklechicken

    sparklechicken Out Of The Brooder

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    They're from a pet store, so I'm sure they're used to a comfortable 72 degrees [​IMG]
     
  5. Mary Of Exeter

    Mary Of Exeter Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Ah. You could put them out there and provide a heat lamp in case they get cold [​IMG] Also, make sure they have perches wide enough to where they don't have to curl their toes around it (example being a 2x4 rather than a little stick/rod that they'd have to cling to). That way they can sit on their feet and keep their little toes warm with their own heat [​IMG] It doesn't get too dramatically cold in California, so with a heat lamp, I think they will be just fine!


    Another thing, they need at least part of the aviary closed in on the sides so that they can get away from any cold direct drafts. Birds can withstand some pretty harsh temps, but to do that, they have to trap the heat close to their body with their feathers. So if the wind gets to them and blows their feathers around, that can make it a lot harder to keep warm.
     
    Last edited: Jan 26, 2011
  6. sparklechicken

    sparklechicken Out Of The Brooder

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    Dec 8, 2010
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    Thanks for the ideas, I'll try that! The aviary is wire on 3 sides and the side of our shed makes up the other side. Is this fine or should I cover one of the three sides? The aviary is 8' tall and 3' wide and long. What is commonly used to cover the sides? It would be nice if I could find something more attractive than a tarp:p
     
  7. Mary Of Exeter

    Mary Of Exeter Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You may want to cover the sides on the part closest to the building. I know tarp is kinda ugly, but it's what I used when I had an aviary [​IMG] Here you can see a few feet on the end being closed in, and the rest open
    [​IMG]
    You can use pretty much anything though. As long as it can keep the wind out, it's good! [​IMG]
     
  8. elmo

    elmo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Personally, I would wait until a time of year when the outdoor temperature more closely matches indoor temperature to switch to outdoor housing. Ringnecks can be content in pretty small cages anyway. I wouldn't be worried about that. On the other hand, suddenly switching them to temperature fluctuations they're not accustomed to could kill them.
     

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