RIR cockerel+BSL=??

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by peepmommy, Feb 15, 2012.

  1. peepmommy

    peepmommy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hi there. I am a newbie at this. In the summer I ended up getting 5 Barred Rocks, 5 RIR, and 5 Black sex links. Now, I know that my RIR rooster mating with RIR hens=RIR chicks, and my rooster mating with my barred rocks will produce black sex links. But if my RIR rooster mates with one of my black sex links I should get either a barred rock or RIR? Is this correct? I am just curious more than anything. They all are really great hens and so far the rooster is a nice boy... if not, into the pot he goes! :) Please let me know as the suspense is killing me!! Thanks sooo much!!
     
  2. smarsh

    smarsh Chillin' With My Peeps

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    you will likely get a very similar look to the black sex link, i believe even the roosters will likely be similarly marked. You no longer have the barred gene or the silver gene, both were sex linked to the male black sex links, so you will get a rather solid colored bird with more or less red in some.
     
  3. Fred's Hens

    Fred's Hens Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    No. The offspring would truly be mixes. Not a BR nor a RIR. Barnyard mix/mutt. But what a good laying mutt, eh? I wouldn't mind, but they'd not be any identifiable breed.
     
    Last edited: Feb 15, 2012
  4. peepmommy

    peepmommy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Great! Thanks so much for the help! I can't wait to see what they make and as long as they are good layers... It's the fun of it!!
     
  5. tadkerson

    tadkerson Chillin' With My Peeps

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    The female black chicks will be black or black with red expressed on the head, hackles and breast ( like a black sex link), the male chicks that are black will be black with some red in the pyle zone. The chicks with whitish down will look like rhode island red. The rhode island red may show some black smut in the feathers.

    Tim

    P.S. I miss read the post and have changed my answer.
     
    Last edited: Feb 16, 2012
  6. OldChurchEggery1

    OldChurchEggery1 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You won't get any barred offspring from a RIR male to BSL female. The Black Sex Link female does not carry any barring and neither does the RIR, so there won't be any barred chicks as a result. Earlier this year I hatched out eggs from a Black Sex Link hen that had been in with a splash Jersey Giant. All offspring were blue with red in the hackles and the males have some red in the sickles now. The principle is the same, though: Non-barred x Non-barred = non-barred.
     
  7. catdaddyfro

    catdaddyfro Overrun With Chickens

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    Oh yeah you'll get barred something outta that group. Just because there's no barring showing doesn't mean it's not there. A BSL hen is still half barred genetically(remember barring is black with white bars, BSL females just don't show the white bars). Barring is a very powerful allel it may show up ten generations from now. In other words once its in the pot (mix) its there. Now there may not be many barred chicks show up, its all a numbers game, works on %(percentage) the more chicks hatched the more that can likely show the barring gene.

    On your cross with the Splash over BSL yeah thats a good combo to create blue for sure but if you hatch enough outta them you'll get some barred ones, most probly blue-barreds and they are very pretty too!
     
  8. OldChurchEggery1

    OldChurchEggery1 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hmm. That's quite contrary to what I have in my book on plumage genetics (Brian Reeder's An Introduction to Color Forms of the Domestic Fowl). Is this from your own breeding experience or from another written source? I'm curious because what you're saying is quite different from what I've read and seen. Barring is sex-linked (on the Z) and if female offspring inherit the W sex chromosome from their barred mother and the Z from their non-barred father, they can only be non-barred because the W doesn't carry barring. That's why it works for commercial hatcheries in the RIR m to Barred Rock f cross: the resulting males exhibit light barring as they only have a single dose of barring while females exhibit no barring at all. Is there a non sex-linked version of barring out there? Or a version that is harbored on the female sex chromosome? Could you show me how it works on a Punnett square? Those are so helpful when discussing inheritance. If you've seen this in your own flock, what cross did you use that had the odd barring pop up? I hope this isn't too many questions, but you've really sparked my curiosity. Practical application of genetic principles is what has helped fuel my interest in keeping chickens, so I love discussions like this.

    Blue barred would be neat to see. If it is in fact genetically possible with the combination of fowl I have, maybe I'll see it in a future hatching. So far everything looks as I've described- blue with a touch of red.
     
  9. nicalandia

    nicalandia Overrun With Chickens

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    That is Correct.. But some hatcheries call production barred birds: Black Sex Links..! Why? I have no idea, but they are barred..



    True. Barring is Sex linked and if you CanĀ“t see it on black birds then its not there(it could be hidding on white birds.)

    Have you seen Chocolate Barred?
     
  10. OldChurchEggery1

    OldChurchEggery1 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    No, I haven't seen a chocolate barred. Once upon a time I had quite a few Barred Rocks, but my husband proclaimed they were too noisy. I miss the barred look but unless there's some recessive, autosomal barring (ha!) lurking in my flock, I doubt I'll have any more barred chickens running around the yard.
     

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