RIR question

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by rancher hicks, Jul 17, 2010.

  1. rancher hicks

    rancher hicks Chicken Obsessed

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    I have the new ALBC book and it mentions RIR's but seems to define them as two different types. Historical and production or something like that. Can anyone tell me the difference. It has the same definition for "leghorns" too.
     
  2. call ducks

    call ducks silver appleyard addict

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    Hi...

    There are Hartige RIR, and Production RIR yes, the main difference is there colour of mahogony
     
  3. Chris09

    Chris09 Circle (M) Ranch

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    The Production type Rhode Island Reds that they are talking about are the Reds that you would get from a hatchery.
    "Historical" Reds would be the Reds that are bred to the American Standard of Perfection (the type you would get from a good breeder).
    It is like comparing Apples and Oranges. A good non-hatchery Red is a lot bigger, darker, and shaped different (they look like a brick with legs, head and a tail).

    Chris
     
    Last edited: Jul 17, 2010
  4. rancher hicks

    rancher hicks Chicken Obsessed

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    Thanks I intend to get soem rosecombs in the spring if I can find decent meat/egg birds.
     
  5. RAREROO

    RAREROO Overrun With Chickens

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    Yes like Chris said, there is a big difference in Production and Heritage RIRs, and yes, leghorns are the same, Production leghorns have a bit differnt shape and flow than exhibition strain Leghorns. I think it would be kinda difficult to find exhibition strain leghorns. And really its the same with most any breed, if you get birds from a hatchery, they are basicly going to be production strains, the will be more productive, but since thats all that hatcheries breed for and not to the standards, they will lack the size, shape, and historical value of well bred breeder/show quality strains.
     

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