RIR questions

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by ice329, Nov 30, 2009.

  1. ice329

    ice329 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Nov 23, 2009
    Hello, I have a few RIR chicks, two are 9 weeks old and a few that are 5 weeks old. How old will they be before I (a newbie) can be sure what I got as far as hens or roosters. Looking at the older ones I see 2 girls but i dont know, this is comparing them to the younger ones that a few definatly have bigger combs and just look and act like roosters to me but I dont know if what I am seeing is correct. What age will I know? Thanks Joey
     
    Last edited: Nov 30, 2009
  2. popcornpuppy

    popcornpuppy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 19, 2009
    Holland, Massachusetts
    I think it depends on where the chicks came from. If they are from a hatchery, most hatcheries breed them to be feather sexed. By the time they are 2 weeks old, you can tell the roos from the girls. The girls have more feathers at a younger age, and feather out faster. The roos have fuzzy buts, shorter wings and larger combs. I have some hatchery and some breeder Reds. The hatchery Reds were easy to sex. The breeder Reds are only 5 weeks old, and I still don't know about the sex on them. Hope this helps.
     
  3. bigdawg

    bigdawg AA Poultry

    Jun 28, 2009
    middle tenn
    when they start to crow. [​IMG] i coudnt help it. you should be able to tell around 12 weeks and four months for sure. the roosters should have a much taller comb by then. and the tail feathers on the roos will curve upward and the pullets will be more flat, or straight out behind them. the pullets will have very little comb at all at that age. i hope i could help. maybe someone has a better way to tell....
     
  4. ice329

    ice329 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Nov 23, 2009
    There is a few with big combs already at 5 weeks but I wasnt sure if pullets get a big combs like that or not. I do see some with low combs..and both the 9 week olds have small combs and I really thought they were pullets but now I see little bumps(spurs?) coming out on there legs, one chicks is bigger then the others. I hatched the eggs but I beleieve there one generation out of McMurry. Prob tomarrow I will snap a few pics and post them. I never knew raising a few chickens was so involved... [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Nov 30, 2009
  5. bigdawg

    bigdawg AA Poultry

    Jun 28, 2009
    middle tenn
    pics do help, sometimes.
     
  6. ice329

    ice329 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Nov 23, 2009
  7. Blue_Myst

    Blue_Myst Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 5, 2009
    I see at least one girl. The darker one looks a little more "husky" and has thicker legs it seems, but his crown isn't all that red. I'm going to say girls at this point, but it's really hard to know until they're a few weeks older. Even then it's not definite until they crow or lay an egg [​IMG]

    Here's a pic of my hatchery RIR hen at roughly twelve weeks, if it helps at all:

    [​IMG]
     
  8. rirluvr

    rirluvr Gallus Domesticus

    I know how you feel.. my RIR's from mcmurr are 4 months old and I am fairly confident they are females but I lack the expertise to know until they either lay eggs or start singing.

    [​IMG]

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    for the longest time I was sure the one below was a male.. I am still not sure what he/she is but we shall see
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Dec 1, 2009
  9. Chook-A-Holic

    Chook-A-Holic Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Central, N.C.
    Looking at their legs and heads, they all look like pullets to me(All of the pics and links in this thread) Mine always have much larger legs and a lot more red on their head, even at 6wks.
     
  10. Happy Chooks

    Happy Chooks Moderator Staff Member

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    Jul 9, 2009
    Northern CA
    My Coop
    Rirluvr.....you have girls.

    Ice......I think both yours are girls as well.
     

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