RIR raised on broiler mix

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering Your Flock' started by HFC, Oct 29, 2007.

  1. HFC

    HFC Out Of The Brooder

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    Will raising RIR pullets from (from the start until laying) affect their laying ability short or long term?
     
  2. HFC

    HFC Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 29, 2007
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    ttt

    Anybody??? I found what I would consider a fair deal on several, but being fed broiler mix from the beginning seems to worry me a bit.
     
  3. greyfields

    greyfields Overrun With Chickens

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    Yes it will affect them. With that much protein they are doing to develop too large and will come into lay too soon. That has a negative long term effect on their fertility.

    What you need to do is get a few bags of cracked corn and mix it in with the broiler feed to get the protein down to around 16%. If you can find "pullet developer" you can use that from 6 weeks to 5.5 months before moving them on to laying ration. But, I've never found pullet developer here, so I just stretch a broiler or starter feed with corn to lower the protien.
     
  4. OHChick

    OHChick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    hi i don't have RIR but i have NH Reds (i think they're cousins). the feed store was mistakenly selling my DH meat bird starter rather than regular chick starter for months. i just have really good looking chickens. i think the protein helped their feathers and growth. they're not fat and they are laying just fine. i did switch them to layer now that they're laying eggs.
     
  5. HFC

    HFC Out Of The Brooder

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    Thanks greyfield. I checked on them today and the owner said they found the first couple of eggs (there are approximately 40 hens). They told me they are around sixteen weeks, but they also told me that about two weeks ago. I'd guess 18 or so.

    I would switch to laying ration if I get them in a bout a month (I'll be in TN for the next month). I guess what I'm asking is is it too late and should I pass?
     
  6. greyfields

    greyfields Overrun With Chickens

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    Quote:There is either no difference, or so very little difference, between chick starter and meat bird starter that it's a non-issue. Don't fret it.
     
  7. greyfields

    greyfields Overrun With Chickens

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    Quote:That is a good month earlier than you'd expect to see the first eggs in a purebreed... and really two months earlier than you'd want to see them.

    Is it the end of the World? No. If you were raising them yourself, should you give them broiler feed? No.

    But, if it is a good deal on price, I wouldn't sweat it. Chickens are resiliant little creatures. And if it turns out these birds do poorly after their first molt, then you'd just replace them. You'll always be able to find new hens if they don't work out; and there's always an auction you can take these ones to if you don't want them any longer.
     
  8. silkiechicken

    silkiechicken Staff PhD Premium Member

    It's not that bad. It is early to lay though. I prefer to feed higher protein feed to my birds BUT, the reason is because they free range, and get ALOT of scraps so they don't get enough protein from only layer. The "layer supplement" I get has 20% protein, which is the same as our meat bird feed in this area. Feeding grower to may poor molting roo battered hen also helped her recover and she's back to her layer looking good.

    If the girls look good, go ahead and get them. I have found though, the earlier my birds started to lay, the shorter they were productive.
     
  9. HFC

    HFC Out Of The Brooder

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    Thanks greyfields and silkiechicken! That's what I was looking for.

    I guess it wouldn't be uncommon for someone selling pullets to want them to look their best.
     

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