RIR with hurt leg

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Julz2u, Dec 10, 2010.

  1. Julz2u

    Julz2u Out Of The Brooder

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    Hi Everyone,

    I have a large RIR rooster who is holding his leg behind him, kind of dragging it and hopping on the other leg. I don't know if I can get my hands on him to check out his leg and hip. He's a little bi polar and I can never tell what kind of mood he's in! What otc pain meds can I give him? I'm not sure what to do. Any ideas would be appreciated.

    Thanks in advance
     
  2. Clay Valley Farmer

    Clay Valley Farmer Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Can you determine that it is hurt? Is there tenderness, swelling, hot spots, discoloration or deformity anywhere on leg or foot?

    If not then it is quite possible that he is ill rather than injured. There are several health issues that can cause lameness. Vitamin defficiency, mycotoxins or mold in feed and Marek's are a few common ones.
     
  3. MuranoFarms

    MuranoFarms Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Baby aspirin. You'll have to look up the correct dose....I believe it was 1 per gallon of water. I gave it to my Arcauna when a brick fell on her leg and broke it. I splinted it and 3 weeks later she's just fine! If it's a break you'll need to stabilize it, but it should heal up fine. Can you see a break? If you get a hold of him and move the leg does it move in ways it shouldn't?
     
  4. Judy

    Judy Moderator Staff Member

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    ! baby aspirin in a cup of water, or just poke it in him, or wrap it in a goody. He might eat it out of your hand.

    You really need to get hold of him and examine it. Might need to cage him in order to rest it. Maybe you can catch him on the roost; has always worked for me, and mine are mostly fairly wild. It will need a splint if it's obviously broken.
     
  5. Clay Valley Farmer

    Clay Valley Farmer Chillin' With My Peeps

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    likely better in the water as dose will be more even.

    Also if you have a hard time handling him to check the leg you will have an even harding time forcing pill down his throat.

    But before I would give any asprin I would check the leg out first to see if it is hurt or if it is more a case of it being weak.

    IMHO chickens don't need asprin, they deal with pain much better than people and it would be a greater bennifit to treat the problem than give a mild pain killer. Also asprin is such a weak pain killer it really won't touch any serious pain that would be enough to make a chicken limp badly, thats if asprin actually even works in a chickens system.
     
  6. Julz2u

    Julz2u Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 14, 2009
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    I'm sort of afraid to try to catch him. He's really big. If I try to get him on the roost, should I cover his head first?
     
  7. Clay Valley Farmer

    Clay Valley Farmer Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Well, it's kind of hard to treat him if you can't catch and hold him. Maybe get a friend to help. Wraping him with a towel can help control him and once wraped up and layed down he will settle right down so you can look his leg over. Also take the time to check him over end to end check eyes, beak, neck, crop, body, vent and everything in case there is any other info that might help explain the leg problem.

    Getting ahold of him when he is roosting at night with a small flashlight might make it easier.
     
  8. Judy

    Judy Moderator Staff Member

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    Quote:Hopefully he'll be asleep, or still groggy or in a bit of a trance if he rouses when you enter the coop. I'd cover head and upper body with a bath towel then quickly wrap my arms around his wings, then tuck him under one arm, still wrapped, like a football. Be sure you get around the wings so he can't flap. Let the feet hang. It's worked for me with roos that, during the day, I can't get within 10 feet of.
     
  9. Julz2u

    Julz2u Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 14, 2009
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    OK, so I got my hands on the hurt rooster. He's holding his leg straight out behind him. His thigh feels warm and when I tried to put his leg under him he curls his toes. There are no cuts or scrapes under his feathers and the leg does not feel dislocated or loose. It feels pretty much like the un hurt leg. He usually will not let me touch him, I guess he knew somehow that I was trying to help. It amazes me how smart these birds can be! Should I try to fashion a splint for him or just give him some aspirin and leave him alone?
     
  10. Judy

    Judy Moderator Staff Member

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    Perhaps it's a strain or sprain or pulled muscle, something of the sort. There could be a pelvic bone injury or hip injury, too. He might heal more quickly if you make him rest in a cage or dog kennel or some such. Or he may recover fine if you just put him back with the flock.
     

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