RIR's and New Hampshire Reds?

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by OkChickens, Dec 9, 2010.

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  1. OkChickens

    OkChickens Orpingtons Are Us

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    What are the differences? All I have found is the name difference. I am looking for a GREAT layer that will not go broody. I will keep a few buffs for that. What are some suggestions? Thank you

    -Nate
     
  2. ardeepapa

    ardeepapa Out Of The Brooder

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    I too want to know what the differences between a RIR and NHR are.
     
  3. OkChickens

    OkChickens Orpingtons Are Us

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    I have researched on the Net and I can't find a real difference, I am wanting to sell about 30-35 of my Buffs and either get RIR's or New Hampshire Reds about 30-45 for the Laying qualities. My goal is to have a small hatching operation when ever I buy or make a Bator. In a few years or so. But for now eggs eggs eggs. Haha
     
  4. Desert Rooster

    Desert Rooster El Gallo Del Desierto

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    i think RIR's are a bit darker red in color. and they have black tips on their tail feathers
     
  5. X2Farm

    X2Farm Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 6, 2010
    Homer, GA
    True RIR (photo taken by OSUMAN)
    [​IMG]

    True New Hampshires (Photo and birds from Kathyinmo)
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  6. spartacus_63

    spartacus_63 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    From what I know about NHR, which is not much, but they were bred exclusively from RIR lines. They are a bit smaller (I believe). There is no substantive data that I can find in regard to their egg production, but I would guess it would be similar to RIR.

    One of the original marketers/breeders of RIRs bred this breed to take advantage of the "Red" popularity. He did sell a bunch of chicks! So if you get down to brass tacks, there really is no difference between a RIR and a NHR unless your interested in the "heritage" show qualities.

    Hope this helps
     
    Last edited: Dec 9, 2010
  7. spartacus_63

    spartacus_63 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Shows how much know... this is a quote for another chicken site:

    "New Hampshire Reds are derived directly from Rhode Island Reds, and over the years they've changed so much from selective breeding that they've come to be recognized as a new breed. The New Hampshire Red differs from the Rhode Island in that it produces more meat (and therefore fewer eggs), it's faster to grow and feather out, it matures early and it's even more vigorous. "
     
  8. kathyinmo

    kathyinmo Nothing In Moderation

    Quote:I know what ya mean .... the more I search, the more I learn! I have also learned the correct name is New Hampshires, not New Hampshire Reds. Seems, as a kid, I had always heard it with the "Reds," on the end.....

    awww, live and learn, right?
     
  9. spartacus_63

    spartacus_63 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have also learned the correct name is New Hampshires, not New Hampshire Reds. Seems, as a kid, I had always heard it with the "Reds," on the end.....

    It is a sad, sad day when I don't learn something new. [​IMG]
     
  10. Illia

    Illia Crazy for Colors

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    They're both rare in heritage form, although New Hampshires, real ones, are REALLY rare. (And they are not called New Hampshire reds)

    They're both dual purpose, but that's kind of where it ends. New Hampshires are a glorious orange, have a much different body type, and don't also come in a rose combed variety.

    Rhode Island Reds are a deep, dark, shimmering red and with a brick shaped body, and have sadly been severely bred to production type birds that now very few people know what a REAL Rhode Island Red is. They also have a rose combed variety, which is even more rare.

    I believe their weights are the same.
     
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