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**Roo - ATTACKED BY HENS**???

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by DouglasPeeps, Jul 28, 2008.

  1. DouglasPeeps

    DouglasPeeps Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 26, 2008
    Colorado
    I have a Partridge Rock Roo that is about 26 weeks old. When we went in the coop this evening to change out the waters and check on everyone I noticed that he had blood on him. He had quite a bit of blood on him, both fresh and dried. It is clear that the hens has been pecking his waddles. The wounds are fresh and there is plenty of blood that has dripped to the lower part of his neck. I checked him all over and he is not hurt anywhere else. We have separated him from the flock. He is in a cage in our enclosed porch. After I got him settled, I went to look at the hens. A couple of my BO hens had blood on their beaks. We kept this rooster out of the three that we had because he was the most friendly and nonaggressive. Could he be too laid back for my hens that they will pick on him?

    Another question is do hens typically "gang up" on roosters? How long should I keep him separated from the flock? Will he have trouble establishing himself with the flock again?

    BTW: he seems quite happy in his new little apartment. [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  2. FarmerDenise

    FarmerDenise Chillin' With My Peeps

    810
    0
    149
    Apr 21, 2007
    Sonoma County
    Put some rooster booster on his bloody spots or some other nasty tasting stuff and put him back with the hens. As long as they don't beat him up too bad, he is better off learning to deal with the girls and establishing himself. They don't call it pecking order for nothing.
    I will often keep a pecked-on bird in a seperate area for overnight and part of the morning, so they get a break, but then I put the bird in with the rest in the afternoons, when I can keep an eye on things.
    Is he younger than the hens? I usually have trouble with one of the hens getting beat up.
    Poor little guy, his feelings are probably hurt too.
     
  3. DouglasPeeps

    DouglasPeeps Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 26, 2008
    Colorado
    He is the same age as all the hens. We got them all together as day olds.
    [​IMG]

    This is my first time with "picking", so what do you use to put on the sores? I am sure I can get some at our local feed store, I just don't know what to get.

    Thanks for your help!
     
  4. DouglasPeeps

    DouglasPeeps Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 26, 2008
    Colorado
    Does anyone else have other suggestions? Just want to make sure I am doing the right thing for him.

    Thanks!!
     
  5. Jenski

    Jenski Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 17, 2008
    Middle Tennessee
    I would be worried about putting him back with them before he is fully healed. I have read a lot more success stories when the "picked on" flock member is healthy and strong again. What about keeping him on vitamins/electrolytes, putting some antibiotic cream on his waddles, keeping him well fed and quiet for a few days? Doesn't look like he is at his best right now.


    Jen in TN
     
  6. morelcabin

    morelcabin Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 8, 2007
    Ontario Canada
    I have a silkie rooster that the red shavers used to attack...it was because they 'prefered' the other rooster. I got rid of the other rooster and tried to put him back in...they still attacked him. I separated him for about two weeks and then tried again. This time he went in and grabbed the first hen he saw for mating...that seemed to put them all in thier places real quick. I think sometimes the roo just needs a little more maturity so he isn't intimidated by them but goes right after them for his 'fix' :>
     
  7. DouglasPeeps

    DouglasPeeps Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 26, 2008
    Colorado
    Quote:What kind of cream?
     
  8. DouglasPeeps

    DouglasPeeps Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 26, 2008
    Colorado
    Quote:That makes sense. Over the last month I have had lots of fertility with my eggs, but it sounds like a couple of my hens want to be the "boss" of him! hehe He is going to have to be much tougher! It is him against 32 of them.
     
  9. DouglasPeeps

    DouglasPeeps Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 26, 2008
    Colorado
    Besides the wounds on his waddles, he seems to be doing well. I think he has crowed a hundred times this morning. I am sure he is calling for his hens!

    Does anyone know what exactly I should be putting on his waddles?
     
  10. Jenski

    Jenski Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 17, 2008
    Middle Tennessee
    I just use Neosporin for something like that. I prefer that around the face instead of Blu-Kote, as I wouldn't want to risk getting the Blu-Kote spray in his eyes.

    (Blu-Kote is a spray you can get at a farm supply store, and contains gentian violet and some other healing agents. I use mainly on superficial, non-facial wounds, as it covers bare skin and somewhat prevents others from pecking.)

    Make sure the waddles are cleaned up, too, before you apply topical meds - you might use a soft, damp cloth and wipe off any dirt, dried blood, etc.

    Hope that helps ~


    Jen in TN
     
    Last edited: Jul 29, 2008

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