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Roo- to- Hen Introduction

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by jwiltrout99, Dec 9, 2016.

  1. jwiltrout99

    jwiltrout99 Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 5, 2012
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    Hello All!

    I'm in need of advice! I have an unusual situation and would love others input. I have a pet rooster - Chicken Little. He has been my pet for about 5 years now. He lives in the house, but of course spends time outside too, and goes everywhere we take our dogs. He is very tame. He was in a flock only up to the point where he "became" a rooster. Last week, I "rescued" a hen (Miss Pinkerton) that was in crisis. She was not part of a flock. She was free-range on the property where I work. I took her to the vet and she had egg-yolk peritonitis, infected preen glands, and arthritis. The vet drained fluid from her abdomen, prescribed antibiotics and pain medication. She is like a brand new bird now! However, the vet has recommended she not be outside in the cold while recovering. I have been taking her to work with me where she stays in my office and then take her home at night where she sleeps downstairs. Chicken Little sleeps upstairs. They have not seen each other as of yet. I'm looking for a sanctuary for her but so far, no luck. Chicken Little travels with us at Christmas. I can't leave this little bird alone over the holidays, not only because she would be alone but I'm still giving her medication. I was thinking of introducing Chicken Little to her by letting them spend time in a shared space but separated by a fence. I guess I'm looking for input and your opinions on how best to handle this. I don't plan on letting them interact directly with one another. Chicken Little is a big boy with spurs and she is small and still recovering. Even though the vet didn't see anything else wrong with her, I'm also worried about a quarantine period. I have been very careful about washing hands, my shoes, clothes, etc. before handling Chicken Little after I have handled Miss Pinkerton. All advice is welcome! We live in Grants Pass, OR if anyone knows of a rescue! ;-> Thank you in advance!
     
  2. Flock Master64

    Flock Master64 Overrun With Chickens

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    You could keep them both in cages next to each other so they can see, talk and interact with each other without any problems.
     
  3. azygous

    azygous Chicken Obsessed

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    Since I have first hand experience with a very contagious disease (lymphotic leucosis) that is not apparent in non-symptomatic chickens, making quarantine ineffective, I recommend that you do not expose your rooster to this little hen, especially since you do not know her history and you do not plan to keep her.

    You're are being so careful and doing everything else right, it would be a shame to expose your rooster to something that might bring you both much grief.

    Try Craig's List. You might be able to find her a home that way. But it's still risky for anyone to adopt a hen not knowing her history.
     
  4. jwiltrout99

    jwiltrout99 Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 5, 2012
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    Thank you for your input! I appreciate it!
     
  5. jwiltrout99

    jwiltrout99 Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 5, 2012
    Grants Pass, OR
    Thank you for your advice! I think I'm going to play it safe & wait and talk to my vet. He did some blood work on Miss P. Would lymphatic leucosis show up in the blood? I'm sorry to hear you have experience with this.Thank you again for your input!
     
  6. azygous

    azygous Chicken Obsessed

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    Ask your vet about testing the hen's blood for this disease. I would expect it's possible, if at least to see if she has any cancer markers. If she's ever been exposed to any of these viruses, Marek's or LL or even some chronic respiratory diseases that are carried in chickens who happen to be asymptomatic, perhaps there's some signal in the blood that indicates she's a carrier.

    It's an interesting question and I would be interested in learning what your vet has to say.
     
  7. jwiltrout99

    jwiltrout99 Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 5, 2012
    Grants Pass, OR
    I will be contacting my vet on Monday & will let you know what I find out. :->
     
  8. chickens really

    chickens really Overrun With Chickens

    Contact any rescue group they always know of Livestock rescues that will take the Bird......



    Cheers!
     

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