Roo with a Tude

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by ke.appaloosas, Oct 16, 2009.

  1. ke.appaloosas

    ke.appaloosas Out Of The Brooder

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    Appaloosa Heaven
    OK, so I understand the basics of a roo--his job is to take care of his flock, but when I am the object of his bad attitude I'm ready to toss him into the crockpot. It got to the point where I wouldn't go into the coop or run without a whacking stick due to him sneaking up/attacking me when I had my back turned. After suffering the indignities of being pecked at one too many times I got a much better whacking stick and the next time he tried to get me I got him back and GOOD. Now he seems to stay a much better distance from me but I still feel slightly intimidated by him. Is it a case of once a nasty roo always a nasty roo or do they mellow at all? If I wasn't so squeamish (or had a neighbor who would take him) I'd send him to the crockpot permanantly...but thought I'd ask for help. He is about 6 months old, if that matters. Thanks!!
     
  2. detali

    detali Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Take it easy. Your roo is just doing what he thinks he should. And yes, carry a stick. I had to wack mine a couple of time too. But I just used my hand across his face. He acted dumb founded, and a little dazed. But with my bare hand I knew I would not damage him. He respects me now.
     
  3. TexasVet

    TexasVet Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You need to scoop that bad boy up and carry him around under your arm, like a football, until he stops struggling. That signals that he's ready to hand the title of "King of the Roost" over to you. You may have to do this multiple times before he completely catches on.

    I make a point of going out to the coop after dark (with a flashlight or headlamp) and picking the roos up off the roost. I talk to them, stroke their backs, and then put them back up on their perch. Knock on wood, not one of them has ever attacked me... although my little roo looks like he thinks he can take me!

    Kathy, Bellville TX
    www.ChickenTrackin.com
     
  4. artsyrobin

    artsyrobin Artful Wings

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    i agree with Kathy, i found this thread-
    https://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?id=251389

    in my case my roo gets a nightly lap time, in the coop with all the girls present- if i am in a hurry and just pet him, it doesn't work the next day- my roo is probably just a bit dense and forgets who is boss, so the lap time seems to really work, occasionally he has actually fallen asleep
     
  5. ke.appaloosas

    ke.appaloosas Out Of The Brooder

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    Appaloosa Heaven
    THANK YOU! I mean, CrockPot thanks you for saving his mean butt..lol....I will start this new routine tomorrow. If I can handle stallions you'd think a roo would be easy by comparison, but I suppose you have to speak the critter's language and understand their mindset in order to be effective. I've had horses my whole life but only just got chicks this year so my chicken-speak is still at a sqwak..
     
  6. artsyrobin

    artsyrobin Artful Wings

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    this is my first year with them too, the big thing for me so far with our Roo, consistency and always keep an eye on him, so he knows i am aware of what he is doing- also, it won't straighten up overnite, it might take a week or so for him to get the hint- i have had to slap him a couple times and tell him no- but after reading that thread, and working with him, i am alot more positive- what breed is your roo?
     
  7. ke.appaloosas

    ke.appaloosas Out Of The Brooder

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    Appaloosa Heaven
    He's a SilverLaced Wyandotte. He's a gorgeous guy, and I have to say that as much as I didn't want a roo, his crowing isn't nearly as annoying as I expected. So far the only bad thing about him is his tude, so I will practice due dilligence and get that straightened out. I so appreciate the help and promise to post photos when I can.
     
  8. gritsar

    gritsar Cows, Chooks & Impys - OH MY!

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    Whack him when you have to. Chase him if he comes at you. Never be the first to walk away. Go in at night and snatch his tude having self off the roost and tote him around for awhile.
    He may mellow some as soon as his hormones level off.
    If you have children, keep them as far away from the roo as possible. Nasty roos can do some serious damage.
     
  9. evonne

    evonne Chillin' With My Peeps

    Oct 5, 2009
    Las Vegas
    if you've never established yourself as the alpha rooster, then he assumes that's his role... i happen to find an article.. wish i had saved the link... when my chickens were only about 2 months old that talked about how to make yourself the alpha roo... and at almost 6 months mine has tried to check me twice.... although it was right as my one hen started laying... so all kinds of wierd hormones going on....
    but i chased him around the run with a stick swinging mear him... not at him.. i'd hit the ground about 6" away from him when he'd slow into a corner... and after a few mins of that i picked him up and carried him around with me while i fed the goats and donkey... then i let him loos opposit side of the acre from the coop.. lol...
    another thing the article says is not to let them breed in your presence... an alpha roo wouldn't let that happen... noone gets his girls...
    next time you have little ones, and this is when i started with this.. it said when you start noticing roo characteristics, that's when you have to establish yourself... when you feed them, push the roo/roos out of the area and let the girls eat first... more stuff that the alpha does...
    the other thing that the article said that i don't do often enough is pick your roo up and love him... make sure he understands that even though you are in charge you're not going to hurt him...

    good luck with crockpot.. lol.... is that his name?? that's great...
     
  10. SC_Hugh

    SC_Hugh Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I go into my coop after dark and hold my young rooster for 5-10 minutes. He is very tame, but those claws still scratch, so I am now wearing long sleeve shirt or sweatshirt.

    He enjoys it and so do I, important to have the girls present so they know who is boss too.

    I need to get a little video of my Little Ricky roo crowing. He has a funny finish that sounds like he ran out of juice.

    Roosters all have tude, some more than others,

    Hugh
     

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