Roo with diarrhea

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by mi2bugz, Nov 11, 2013.

  1. mi2bugz

    mi2bugz Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I noticed today that my 8 week old roo has diarrhea. I heard 2 back to back really watery stools that were like a "spray". By the time I got my camera it had soaked into the ground so I couldn't get a pic.

    The chicks were just changed to layer pellets 2 days ago. They aren't wanting to eat it but they have eaten some and they were also introduced to happy hen mealworm with corn pieces this week. Any help would be very much appreciated. Thank you!

    ~ Nicole
     
  2. ChickensAreSweet

    ChickensAreSweet Heavenly Grains for Hens

    Your rooster could have coccidiosis at that age...it can cause plain watery diarrhea, without the bloody poo. I personally treat with Corid (cattle section of feed store). Of course diarrhea can be caused by many things but he is at that age (8 weeks and under when it usually strikes)...other signs are lethargy, feathers fluffed up, won't eat or drink, stands by himself in a corner, bloody poo or diarrhea.

    Layer pellets have a huge amount of calcium in them, suitable only for laying hens who need all that to form eggshells.

    They need starter or starter/grower until 8 weeks of age, then starter/grower or grower from 8 weeks until the POL (point of lay), approximately 5 months old.

    Since you have bought them already, you can store them up to 4 months IF they are kept free from moisture, and cool. If you are unable to store them safely, you may be able to mix them into the feed very very sparingly to get rid of them (I have done this myself) but do be aware that the excess calcium can damage the kidneys of the chickens. So everyone on BYC always says not to feed them if they aren't ready to lay.

    If you have only a few chickens I'd personally freeze the layer pellets in the freezer, and take them out little by little when they reach 5 months so they don't turn moldy. IF you have tons of chickens then you can probably get rid of them slowly as I described or store them with your other feed.

    Just my opinion!
     
  3. mi2bugz

    mi2bugz Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Going to get the grower feed tomorrow. Which is better....20% or 24%?

    Any special way to freeze the layer pellets? I only have 4 chicks and a 5 lb bag. Freeze in gallon zip lock freezer bags and take it out 1 bag at a time?

    Are the dosing instructions for the Corid on the package? Could it be the layer pellets causing diarrhea if only given to them for 2 days and they haven't eaten much of it?

    The layer pellets are only for egg layers...do you feed the roo differently?

    I know this probably belongs on the feed/water forum but it seems to go together so I apologize for it in this forum.

    I appreciate the help so much!
     
  4. mi2bugz

    mi2bugz Chillin' With My Peeps

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    With the Corid should I treat all the chicks or separate the sudpected affected chick?
     
  5. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive True BYC Addict

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    When treating for coccidiosis, it is best to treat all of them at the same time, because the sick one will excrete coccidia oocysts, and you will then have chicks getting sick at different times.
     
  6. ChickensAreSweet

    ChickensAreSweet Heavenly Grains for Hens

    Grower is usually 17% protein.

    I would only give them previously frozen feed in an amount lasting one to two days due to the possibility of mold formation, which can kill chickens. I have actually lost chickens to moldy feed.

    Corid is approved for poultry in the treatment of coccidiosis (search FDA Amprolium approved poultry). However, the label doesn't say what to do for poultry. It is in the cattle section of the feed store.

    You can search BYC and the web also, but what I do is the following: Corid 9.6% liquid (comes in powder too but different dose), 9.5 ml per gallon of drinking water for 5 days. Mix new solution daily and don't administer vitamins during this time due to amprolium (Corid) being a thiamine blocker.

    If a chick is not drinking enough, they may not receive enough medication and thus it is good to syringe alongside the beak (not pouring down throat) drops of medicated water so that the little one receives treatment.

    Generally I see improvement after 24 hours of treatment. Thus, if the diarrhea doesn't go away then there may be another cause. I have had to do two rounds of treatment sometimes. I have had to treat three month olds for this, even. They will become immune to the cocci as they age. If they are exposed to different soil or become immunocompromised at some point in their lives, coccidiosis can occur.

    It can be a silent affliction as well, where they suffer gut pain and future utility is compromised. Thus it is good to treat in juvenile chickens if you suspect it.

    I never separate them for coccidiosis, personally.
     
  7. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member Project Manager

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    Just an FYI, the chick starters in my area are 18-22% protein depending on what brand it is, some are medicated, some are not. Some are medicated with amprolium, some also have bacitracin. Turkey and gamebird starters and 26.5-30% protein.

    -Kathy
     
    Last edited: Nov 12, 2013
  8. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member Project Manager

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    If you decide to treat with amprolium these are the amounts recommended by the mfg and the FDA.
    The severe outbreak dose (.024%) for Corid Powder is 1.5 teaspoons (4.536 grams).
    The severe outbreak dose (.024%) for Corid liquid is 2 teaspoon.


    The moderate outbreak dose (.012%) for Corid Powder is 3/4 teaspoon (2.268 grams).
    The moderate outbreak dose (.012%) for Corid liquid is 1 teaspoon.


    The .006% dose for Corid Powder is 1/3 teaspoon (1.134 grams).
    The .006% dose for Corid liquid is 1/2 teaspoon.
    FDA recommendations:
    http://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/animaldrugsatfda/details.cfm?dn=013-149
    "Chickens
    Indications: For the treatment of coccidiosis.
    Amount: Administer at the 0.012 percent level in drinking water as soon as coccidiosis is diagnosed and continue for 3 to 5 days (in severe outbreaks, give amprolium at the 0.024 percent level); continue with 0.006 percent amprolium-medicated water for an additional 1 to 2 weeks."
    And this link has these instructions:
    http://www.drugs.com/vet/amprol-9-6-solution-can.html
    "Poultry - as Soon As Caecal Coccidiosis Is Diagnosed, Give 0.024% Amprolium In The Drinking Water For 5 To 7 Days. Continue The Treatment With 0.006% Amprolium Medicated Water For An Additional One To Two Weeks. No Other Source Of Drinking Water Should Be Available To The Birds During This Time."


    This link has more info and the math done to come up with the dosing numbers:
    https://www.backyardchickens.com/t/818879/updated-corid-and-amprol-amprolium-dosing

    -Kathy
     
  9. mi2bugz

    mi2bugz Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Y'all are amazing! So helpful. I really appreciate it.

    I got the chick starter/grower for the next couple weeks, will go to the poultry grower/finisher when at 10 weeks and then to layer feed as soon as first egg arrives.

    Thank you again for your help and patience!
     
  10. mi2bugz

    mi2bugz Chillin' With My Peeps

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    So we have had 5 doses of the medium outbreak formula and 3 days of the follow up dose and my roo still has diarrhea. Should I do the 10 day treatment? He is acting normal and eating/drinking well.
     

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