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Roof condensation

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by RobinZ, Oct 18, 2009.

  1. RobinZ

    RobinZ Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Well I think I have a problem. We had a freak snow storm last week here in PA. During it I noticed my coop's inside roof was sweating. I have one of those Amish built 4x6 coops. What is the best solution, I have a long window on one side covered w hard wire, should I leave this open? I am afraid it will make the coop too cold as the window is eye level w chicks on roost. Thanks in advance for any suggestions you may have.
     
  2. elmo

    elmo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Uh, oh. Sounds like you do need more ventilation, and it sounds like the window isn't in the right spot to ventilate without risking a draft on your birds.

    Can you move the roost? Can you block the bottom part of the window and leave an open space only at the top? The only other thing I can think of is cutting another vent at the top of one or more of your walls.
     
  3. RobinZ

    RobinZ Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks Elmo for your input. I was hoping someone w the same coop could tell what they have done to stop this problem. There are alot of these coops out there and I would think they have the same problem as well.
     
  4. wombat

    wombat Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 23, 2009
    Assuming that's your coop in your avatar ...

    If you don't mind making modifications to your nice coop, get a hole saw (round cutter that you put in a power drill) and cut a round hole near the top of each gabled wall. Save the cutout.

    Put hardware cloth over the hole from the inside.

    Get a small metal swing latch, and you can put the insert back into the hole and turn the latch down any time you want to close the hole on one side if it gets too windy.

    Most hole saws have a bit in the center, which will leave a small hole in the center of the cutout. You can hang the cutout inside the coop on some small finishing nails or brads, and then take one out to close the hole on one side if you need to.
     
  5. elmo

    elmo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oh, I thought of something else. How often to you clean out the poop? If you don't clean it out every morning, you could try that and see if it helps to cut down the humidity.
     
  6. LynneP

    LynneP Chillin' With My Peeps

    I agree with elmo- install vents high up and make sure you can shut them if you have a prevailing wind that will bring snow into your coop. Also, if you are willing to insulate and sheathe the roof, you will eliminate the condensation. The window sounds as though it needs to be closed during cold weather, and plexiglass can be hinged easily to an opening. I usually buy mine from scratched stock at our hardware store to save money. Around chickens they get marked up anyway! It's always an experiment, and you folks certainly got hammered by that cold spell. In a way it's a blessing because if you choose to renovate, you still have time before the real hammer of winter strikes. I also clean daily and have no humidity buildup.

    Some continuing thoughts on winter-

    https://www.backyardchickens.com/web/viewblog.php?id=7693-seasonal-concerns

    and there is a page on insulation linked to the one above.

    [​IMG]
     
  7. RobinZ

    RobinZ Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks all for your help.
     
  8. Tecalli

    Tecalli Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks RobinZ for this post and for the great suggestions.
    I have the same style coop, except smaller- 4x4. I have been reading all the great information on BYC as I prepare for my first winter with my three girls. I have no building experience and the primary suggestions seems to be to provide ventilation but prevent drafts. I'm not very clear on this as it seems somewhat contradictory.

    So far what I have done to try and achieve both is to open the long vent thats about 4 inches high in the back but put foam into most of it and seal so there is only a 1/2 inch at the top. Then from the outside I added a 3 sided cover (open at the bottom) so that wind and snow can't blow in. So far I've noticed no condensation on the roof and no smell inside the coop. But should I do more, for example, the drilling at the top suggested?

    Also, why is it better to drill at the top of each gabled wall (which is the direction the wind blows) rather than at smaller holes at the top of the non-gabled walls where near where the roof overhangs the walls. Because of the overhang and because thats not the direction of the wind I wouldn't have to worry about closing them to prevent snow and strong winds from wcoming in.

    Thanks for any advice and suggestions!
     
  9. RobinZ

    RobinZ Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Tecalli, I appreciate your response and ideas. I am like you worried about too much heat loss in such small coop space. But I am sure these more experienced people know what they talk about. I am very new to chickens and am glad for the help. My DH will probably do as suggested and drill holes in the gabled ends. I will also try to keep coop more cleaned out, I was trying to layer but seems counterproductive causing too much moisture.
     
  10. newchicksnducks

    newchicksnducks Chillin' With My Peeps

    By "trying to layer", where you thinking "deep litter"? I use the deep litter method, but still have to do a daily or two-three day cleanup on the droppings board under their roost. If not I would soon be run out of the coop from the smell![​IMG]

    I can't say enough about the dropping board...I really think it catches 75+% of the droppings. If you scoop this out periodically, that which gets into the other areas and shavings can be turned weekly. They soon dry and leave minimal odor. By cleaning the droppings board regularly, you will be eliminating a LOT of moisture and odor from your coop.[​IMG]
     

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