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Roof Turbine

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by ncgrad00, Jul 23, 2010.

  1. ncgrad00

    ncgrad00 In the Brooder

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    Jun 21, 2010
    Salem
    I have run into a problem with my coop. I have a 4 by 8 coop with 2 windows on each side and then a 4 by 2.5 door on the front. I dont really have any room on the sides of the coop to mount and vents. My thought was to install a roof turbine for ventilation. I can make it so it is on top of the roost of to away from the roost. My question is will the roof turbine work (not leak when it rains) and where should I install it (over the roost or away from it)? Let me know my options.
     

  2. blkdogchick

    blkdogchick In the Brooder

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    Apr 6, 2010
    southwest mi
    I have one on the roof @ the highest point to draw the heat out and it works great. So I would say as long as you have a decent amount of wind during the year there great.
     
  3. patandchickens

    patandchickens Flock Mistress

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    Apr 20, 2007
    Ontario, Canada
    I'd steer away from those turbine vents for this kind of situation. (Though they are great for some other situations, like haylofts and attics, where you have a much larger space but no ability to have 'holes in the walls')

    First, the only time they offer any greater benefit than a simple roof vent is when the wind is blowing, but you know, if you can have any meaningful amount of windows/vents on the walls, THOSE provide better ventilation on a breezy day ANYhow.

    Second, yes, rain and snow will come in, and cold air will dump down right onto the roosting chickens (b/c your coop is small), unless you plug it up in wintertime, in which case what was the point again? [​IMG]

    If you have SO many windows (do you have pics by any chance?) then summertime ventilation should not be a problem; the only problem is ensuring winter-worthy ventilation too, and (pics please?) you really SHOULD be able to achieve that by making vents at the top of the walls either over top of the windows, between the windows, or in the soffits (roof overhang).

    So personally I would suggest that if you HAVE to cut a hole in the roof, just do a regular attic vent not one of the whirly thing (just more to blow off in a storm and you won't really get much of any *benefit* from it in your situation, with so many windows); but you may well not need that, just find somewhere to stick in normal passive ventilation openings of a sort you can use in wintertime, and rely on windows for your extra summer ventilation needs.

    JMHO, good luck, have fun,

    Pat
     
  4. ncgrad00

    ncgrad00 In the Brooder

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    Jun 21, 2010
    Salem
    You are correct summer is not a problem because the windows are open. I am worried about the winter because the windows will be closed. I have a 6 inch by 3in space I could put a vent above the windows but this will blow directly on the roosts also.
     
  5. Chicken of the Sea

    Chicken of the Sea In the Brooder

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    Jan 1, 2008
    Wellsboro, PA
    I use a roof vent and it works fine, rain and snow never get in.
     

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