Roofing , which one should i use?

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by conny63malies, Feb 12, 2013.

  1. conny63malies

    conny63malies Overrun With Chickens

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    My 3x4 coop is almost done. I will use it for 5-6 light breed hens at night later this year, just for one winter until i got money and time to build a larger coop After that i will more than likely use it for breeding some kind of bantam ( dutch or D' Uccle) Anyways its the Kennel Coop plus plan i got off Ebay. http://www.ebay.com/itm/Chicken-coo...660?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item232742dcb4 . I painted the whole thing in Glidden 2-1 Frosted Pine and the trim inside is Gold Coast White ( yellowish tint) the inside of the nesting box will be a very dark purple (oops paint). I dont want to use the metal roofing because i dont want to run all over the place trying to find the right one and i dont like cutting metal anyways. The coop will be used in South Eastern Ky . I dont think there are any mountain lions down there yet. I worry mainly about racoons and similar predators. Will the Palruf good enough or should i use Plywood and then shingle roofing. Or maybe Plywood and then Palruf? Or What else would the be? What color roof would you use? THe reddish color, gray, white.....? So many questions . Oh and if you want to know . I used 1/2x1/2 hardware cloth stapeled to the frame and then backed it with a strip of 1x3.
     
  2. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Chicken Obsessed

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    I'd go with a plywood roof but that with shingles would outlive your coop life plans by about 20 years.
    Something I use is EPDM rubber over the plywood. It comes in white and black. It glues on, is very lightweight, super easy to work with and lasts forever. If you don't glue it and rather lay it on and fasten it below the eaves you can reuse it multiple times.

    I would add some vents to that building though like gable vents and even a ridge vent.
     
    Last edited: Feb 12, 2013
  3. conny63malies

    conny63malies Overrun With Chickens

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    I added a second door in the back and will prob cut a small window into that. If no window i will add a round vent near the gable. Is it hard to work with shingles? I never used them , only the Palruf. Any special tools for the shingles?
     
  4. debid

    debid Overrun With Chickens

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    I'm using corrugated plastic roofing on my little grow-out coop. One sheet cut in half is perfect and easy to install. Plus, now I don't need to find a small window because the roof will let in light (it's in the shade and well-ventilated, no worries about making a greenhouse). We shingled the big coop. It wasn't hard other than that standard roofing nails are meant for thicker plywood so we had to be very careful to avoid making a pincushion ceiling. Oh, and check outside the construction area door at Lowe's for broken bundles of shingles. We were able to pick one up for a fraction of the cost that way and there was nothing wrong other than torn packaging.
     
    Last edited: Feb 12, 2013
  5. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Chicken Obsessed

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    Excellent point.
    Roofing nails come in all lengths. Measure the thickness of the plywood, add about 1/4 inch for the roofing and you should get no penetration.
    Other than a hammer you need a boxcutter type knife with a good hooked blade.
    Most shingle packs actually have instructions on them. You also need felt paper that goes on first and then the shingles on top. You need a starter course they sell in rolls or for a small job like yours make them out of half shingles cut lengthwise.
    I put gutters on most of my coops to keep the area from becoming a mud pit.
     
  6. Adam7

    Adam7 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    If you don't want your shingles coming off, you actually want penetration. Just a little is fine.

    Also make sure to place felt paper down first to ensure a water tight seal. If your not lookin to spend a bunch of money, check Craigslist for scrap shingles and felt. You won't need much for such a small coop.

    It sounds like you put a lot of time an attention to detail with paint etc. I would definitely recommend putting shingles on as it will be the most aesthetically pleasing option.
     
  7. Egghead_Jr

    Egghead_Jr Overrun With Chickens

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    Any blade will cut asphalt shingles. I used a sheet rock/ utility knife. You scour the shingle with knife against a straight edge then bend it. Breaks with clean edge. The first row is the top half of shingles then you start to lay over that. It provides bottom layer to cover plywood where the slits are in shingles. The left over of the half shingles becomes the top ridge cover. If that makes sense. It makes for a lot of added weight to small coops. Added 30 lbs easy to my 4x4 coop. Also used tacks instead of roof nails to ensure roof wasn't a pin cushion too. Made coop from 3/8 sheathing.

    [​IMG]

    Perhaps you can see the top ridge here is the left over half sheets, cut so only colored tabs used. Bend over top ridge and lapped over each other to make the cap.

    This baby is heavy with the shingles. It's now on 4x4 stilts in a 10'x10' chain link kennel.
     
  8. TXchickmum

    TXchickmum Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I think that either option (shingles or the corrugated roofing) would be fine especially since it is temporary. We used corrugated roofing (albeit metal) on our coops (which, too, were only intended for about a year's worth of use.) -going to completely cover the new run with the "Palruf" and some guttering so it doesn't get soaking wet. -don't think you can go wrong with either option.

    p.s. love the profile pic of Popcorn Sutton [​IMG]
     
  9. conny63malies

    conny63malies Overrun With Chickens

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    Well temporary for the bigger girls. But a permanent coop for 3-4 Dutch or D'Uccles. I will prob go with the corrugated roofing in a color that is opaque but still lets filtered light through. White or a light cream or green. I already got the fasteners for it from the dog house project. Plus the stuff is light and easy to cut. TXchickmum Popcorn is a bit of an Idol of mine. I was lucky enough to have some of his "likker" .
     
  10. TXchickmum

    TXchickmum Chillin' With My Peeps

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    It is light weight and easy to work with, and that's the reasons I like it. -going with a tinted gray color on our run to let in the filtered light in winter, but block the summer sun. Good luck with your coop project! (...and 'bout that likker: [​IMG] )
     

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