Room temperatures and incubating question

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by jossanne, Feb 4, 2009.

  1. jossanne

    jossanne Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 11, 2008
    Gila, New Mexico
    I'm currently gathering supplies to make me a MissPrissy bator. I'm anxious to get it together and start making it work. I'll start on my own mutt eggs until I've (hopefully) got it running smoothly.

    Anyway... we live in a big old house with no central heat or cooling. I'm in the mountains of southwest New Mexico, so our winters aren't extreme, but we do get cold. We heat the house with a wood stove, and that only heats about half of it. It gets pretty chilly during the nights in that half of the house - probably into the 50's.

    The rest of the house, including my bedroom, the sewing room, and the laundry room, really get no benefits from the heater. I put my digital thermometer/hygrometer that I got for the bator in my room yesterday, and the temps swung from 48 degrees to 63 degrees.

    The living room swings much more than that, going from mid 50's to high 70's, depending on how much wood I've stuck in the stove.

    There is also a basement/cellar, with access only from outside the house. I think temperatures are quite a bit more stable down there. But we're rarely down there, and I'm afraid that any problem that came up during incubation wouldn't be noticed and remedied quickly enough.

    So my question is, in an old tumbledown house like this, do I have any chance of getting a styrofoam bator to hold constant temps? Is it hopeless to even try? Is there something I can do to enhance it to keep a steady temperature? Would you put it in the part of the house that is warm during the day, or keep it where it's always cool? Do I dare stick it in the basement?
     
  2. pips&peeps

    pips&peeps There is no "I" in Ameraucana

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    Jan 18, 2008
    Newman Lake, WA
    I know you don't want an incubator in a room where the temperature fluctuates more than 10 degrees and that is for my cabinet style one. So any fluctuation for a small one would greatly decrease your hatching ability.
     
  3. jossanne

    jossanne Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 11, 2008
    Gila, New Mexico
    I put my thermometer/hygrometer in my sewing room last night, and the temperature has only fluctuated in the room by 12 degrees. Still relatively cool, but I think I can combat that more easily than a large temperature shift. Any chance of hatching in that room?

    Tomorrow I'll try the laundry room.
     
  4. jossanne

    jossanne Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 11, 2008
    Gila, New Mexico
    OK, the thermometer has been in the laundry room for 24 hours now, and the temperature has fluctuated between 55 and 65 degrees. This looks to be my most stable room, besides the basement.

    What are the chances of a successful hatch in a room with a 10 degree heat fluctuation?

    What do you think of hatching in a cellar/basement? Would it be better to hatch in the laundry room, where I can keep a much closer eye on things?
     
  5. ranchhand

    ranchhand Rest in Peace 1956-2011

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    SC
    Quote:

    Yes. As they get closer to hatching, you will be all over it, watching! What about some kind of container- like a box, cabinet, closet type structure, where you can control the temp better? Even a big cardboard box from some appliance?
     
  6. jossanne

    jossanne Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 11, 2008
    Gila, New Mexico
    I thought about putting it in a box, but I wasn't sure if that would keep it from getting enough ventilation/oxygen.

    What if I built my incubator double thick? Like put one ice chest inside a slightly larger ice chest, with corresponding ventilation holes? Maybe a tube/hose through both holes to make sure that the air gets through ok?

    When you build an adobe house, it is best insulated by building it two layers of bricks thick, with an airspace between the layers. Maybe applying that to my incubator would help insure stable temps inside?
     
  7. dave27889

    dave27889 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    If you are using the hot water heater type thermostat you are going to have variations in the incubator of about plus or minus 6 degrees. You will want as stable of room temp as possible. I wish you good luck. I have 3 of these type incubators and I use the wafer type thermostate in 2 of them and the water heater type in 1 of them. I have only a half degree varyation in the 2 with the wafer type thermostat and I have a swing of 6 degrees in the hot water type. It also takes the water heater type longer to recover and the temp goes above 104 degress for a short time and then goes down by 6 degrees. Good luck
     
  8. jossanne

    jossanne Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 11, 2008
    Gila, New Mexico
    So if my room temp isn't very stable, I should have the most stable thermostat. That is good advice. I will look for a wafer setup. Thanks!
     
  9. ranchhand

    ranchhand Rest in Peace 1956-2011

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    I haven't tried such an arrangement, but I think you're on the right track. Maybe a "structure" with 3 sides and a roof, something well ventilated and no heat going out through the top- most incubators have a window on top, so it's easy to monitor temp and humidity- maybe windows on the sides?
     
  10. jossanne

    jossanne Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 11, 2008
    Gila, New Mexico
    And I'd probably want to come up with a turner that I can operate from the outside, so I don't have to be opening it up to turn eggs all the time. Right? That would help me keep temperatures stable?
     

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