Rooster attacked and missing an eye. Now wont eat or drink. I think he's dying.

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Dianemap, May 3, 2017.

  1. Dianemap

    Dianemap New Egg

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    May 3, 2017
    Hi, I'm new to this forum. I have back yard chickens and I think hawks have been getting them. Over the weekend something got a chicken but it seem my rooster tried to save her. He was a mess. Looks like one eye is gone. It's been about 4 days or so but he's not eating or drinking. He trys but he stops about 2 mm short of the food or water. It's as if he doesn't have depth perseption. He'll drink from the dropper because I just put it on his beek. He was taking some Kifer by dropper too but not as much anymore. I put electrolytes in the water but don't know what to do to get him to eat and drink on his own. Sounds crazy but do chickes need both eyes to eat or is this something else? What should I do? He's loosing energy fast! Thanks, Diane
     
  2. summerrrjl

    summerrrjl New Egg

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    May 5, 2016
    Kansas
    Hi Diane!'

    I am no chicken expert, but I have had experience with your type of situation.

    I had a raccoon invade our chicks house last year, killing three of our six. Two were fine and the last one, Mini, had half of her face missing. No eye, no skin, you could see her jaw moving. I was thinking of putting her out of her misery, but I had enough chicken deaths for that day.

    I isolated her by keeping her in my room. She had no balance and no depth of perception. She was not eating and not drinking. I took her to the vet the next day because the situation seemed grim. They gave her a shot and sent me home with two medications and a cream for the area.

    Getting her to eat was a challenge, to say the least. It takes patience. I started with Mini by seeing if she could eat from a shot glass. I would put her in between two pillows with a towel covering them and mash up regular chicken food, electrolytes, and warm water (kind of like a porridge). I would hold it up to her beak and dip her beak in it. If she ate, I would let her eat on her own. Of course, your roo might reject that. Mini would not eat on her own at first, I had to force feed her for about two weeks before she ate and drank on her own.

    My method was to get her wrapped in towels, get a syringe, and fill in up wiht the mixture I described earlier, but more watery so it could fit in the syringe. I would also do this with water and her medication. I would hold the syringe near her beak, put two fingers on the bottom of her beak. She would open her beak and I would quickly squirt the contents of the syringe into her mouth. I would do it at the tip of the beak as to avoid transferring the contents into the larynx. It takes time, but it's for the best.

    It has been about a year. Her eye healed up (it is just a socket now) and she can do anything a regular chicken can do. She is not uncoordinated and, over time, it can get better.

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  3. Dianemap

    Dianemap New Egg

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    May 3, 2017
    Thank you so much Summer!! This gives me hope. It's exactly what I'm going to do!
    Thank you again. You were a great help!
    ~Diane
     
  4. summerrrjl

    summerrrjl New Egg

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    May 5, 2016
    Kansas
    Sure thing!

    If that does not help, tube feeding should do the trick. There are many great threads on this already and it is a great way to get large quantities of food to them. It's not as scary as it looks and I would highly recommend it if your roo is not responding to the syringe technique.

    I hope he gets well soon!
    - Summer
     

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