Rooster Attacking Me

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by wast3d, Mar 11, 2015.

  1. wast3d

    wast3d New Egg

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    Hello All. I love chickens ever since I was a small kid - The problem is the new rooster I have... Today I was picking him up and he bite me back on hand. What should I do to teach him a lesson or to tell him, I am the alpha.

    I had a similar rooster around 1 year ago and I had to get rid of him because of that behavior.
     
  2. lazy gardener

    lazy gardener Flock Master

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    First off, I'd not pick him up unless I needed to. Don't try to make a pet out of a rooster. Hens, ok, but not roosters. Second, I recommend that you make him get out of your way when you're tending the flock. Use a thin pole to nudge him out of the way... NUDGE, not hit! Just a little prod from the side of the pole on his back side to get him to go where you want him to go. You can add a verbal command when you're teaching him. Chickens aren't any where as stupid as people think they are. Several folks who've worked with their roosters have them so well taught that they respond to verbal reprimand. When you give the girls treats, keep him away from the treats until the girls have had their fill. That is, unless he is actually tid-bitting and sharing with the girls. Spend some time every day, herding him a bit. If this training doesn't work, he'll make a delightful stew.
     
    1 person likes this.
  3. chooks4life

    chooks4life Overrun With Chickens

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    Greetings and [​IMG]

    Complicated question and the general answer is that there's nothing you can do that will be guaranteed.

    I used to retrain, now just cull against bad behaviors, and it's been years since I've bred any aggressive chickens of either gender. Genetic influence is very strong.

    If you do find anything that works with this rooster, you will almost certainly have to repeat it with his offspring (and their offspring, and their offspring, and so forth) for about 7 generations roughly to eradicate the trait and it can take even longer.

    If you have the time you can read through some threads on this topic, I'd guess you could work through various 'rehabilitation' or 'retraining' methods, and if they don't work long term, be rid of this rooster too. Or put up with him and manage the issue.

    There are genuinely great roosters out there, I personally can't be bothered spending the time on nasty ones anymore. Also I have small kids around to consider the wellbeing and safety of, and keeping chooks permanently caged is not an option for me so that influences my choices here as well.

    Both threads below have links to other threads discussing the same stuff as well. Different viewpoints galore. ;)
    Quote: Quote: And this link below is to a general search of the topic's keywords in the whole forum so provides a lot more viewpoints as well.
    Quote: Best wishes.
     
  4. JJSS89

    JJSS89 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    If this rooster could type he might start a thread entitled, "Human Attacking Me"

    Lots of birds will do this when you first grab them. They are startled and see your hands as attacking them.

    The only problem - unless you want a pet rooster - is when he fights you unprovoked.
     
  5. chooks4life

    chooks4life Overrun With Chickens

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    None of mine react with violence when grabbed. All of my roosters are subject to the exact same handling and feeding practices as hens and I don't have any violence/aggression issues between chickens or humans and chickens. I think it depends a heck of a lot on what mental types you breed on, since everything in my experience has only served to prove that.

    Best wishes.
     
  6. JJSS89

    JJSS89 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Just my two bits but I don't think the OP posted enough information for me to determine that this rooster is even aggressive [​IMG] fighting back when scared is not violence/aggression. Who knows how and how often this rooster has been handled.
     
  7. chooks4life

    chooks4life Overrun With Chickens

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    It's all good JJSS89, that's your opinion, there's mine, we can agree to disagree. :) I was just providing info on my experiences.

    There's a lot of back and forth completely contradictory info on this subject which gets raised whenever it's discussed... Old nuggets like:
    'Don't handle males, they'll be aggressive'.
    'Handle them or they'll be aggressive'.
    'Don't hand feed, they'll be aggressive'.
    'If you don't hand feed, they'll be aggressive'.
    'Don't let them mate in front of you, they'll be aggressive'.
    'Don't interfere with them mating, they'll be aggressive'.

    Etc. I'm sure we're all familiar with these. They're all true in someone's experience. Obviously can't be true in everyone's. In my experience it's all down to breeding, nothing you do to a stable natured chook will make him aggro, and nothing you do to an aggro chook will make him not aggro. But others disagree with that. Complex subject as I said before.

    Personally I view 'fighting back' when handled as being aggression, which is of course different from terrified/panicking struggling as shown by a never-handled bird trying to get free.

    We're all just providing our opinions and the OP can pick and choose what sounds right to them or is supported by their experiences, or test out theories. I see things differently to you, doesn't make you less entitled to your opinion of course, I'm not trying to silence anyone here lol.

    Best wishes.
     
  8. Happy Dad

    Happy Dad Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Disclaimer: This is my personal experience only, may or may not work for you.

    We have a Gold Sebright rooster that would chase me when my back was turned and attack my legs and feet. Not my wife or kids, just me. I did a search here and found this link. I tried #1 and it has worked like a charm. I scooped him up and him and I went for a walk through the woods, talk about one nervous chicken. Every now and then he forgets who's boss and we have to repeat it. It's comical when I finally put him back down and he returns to his girls. He has to put on a big show to prove that he is still "their" boss.

    https://www.backyardchickens.com/a/dealing-with-roosters-roo-behavior

    "(1) At the first sign of aggression grab your rooster up and hold him no matter how much he kicks, screams and protests. DO NOT PUT HIM DOWN! Walk around with him, do chores while holding him or whatever, let him calm down and stay that way for 15-30 minutes until he has settled. Then at your discretion you can put him down. If he kicks, screams or squawks while you are releasing him, pick him up and repeat this cycle until he submits to you, and will walk off peacefully when you let him down. Do this every time he shows aggression, repeat as needed. If after 3 weeks of doing this every day his behavior is still the same, proceed to the next level."
     
  9. JJSS89

    JJSS89 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Indeed, I think we agree for the most part anyway.

    As far as the rules on them mating... [​IMG] I've never interfered or insisted on them taking it inside the henhouse. If interfering made them aggressive then I believe my Second Fiddle Rhode Island Red Rooster would be aggressive as all get out by now. The Head Rooster never lets him finish the job [​IMG]
     
  10. wast3d

    wast3d New Egg

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    Thanks to all for the replies. The behavior is similar just like a lot of you posted. He will do nothing when I am facing him - When i turn my back, he tries to attack. I will apply the methods posted here. Cheers! [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Mar 11, 2015

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