rooster behavior problems

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by abikalyss, Feb 4, 2017.

  1. abikalyss

    abikalyss Just Hatched

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    0
    14
    Jun 6, 2016
    Virginia
    This is the closest category I found to my question sorry if it's wrong. I have a beautiful rooster, I raised him from a baby took great care of him like all my chickens and handled him enough to keep him tame. The rest of my chickens I can walk up to and pick up and pet, they'll even come to me, but this rooster seems to hate me and only me. He attacks me every day and is extremely violent to the point he'll occasionally hurt himself to try to attack me (and again ONLY me). What went wrong? What should I do?
     
  2. abikalyss

    abikalyss Just Hatched

    29
    0
    14
    Jun 6, 2016
    Virginia
    [​IMG]
    I have 38 birds, 10 are roosters. And its only him that acts so violently towards me.
     
  3. Beekissed

    Beekissed True BYC Addict

    Could be he's the only one that was affected by the imprinting you did when he was a chick. It's best to not hand feed, nurture or otherwise imprint on male birds.....the tales of "hand tamed" cockerels who turn on their caregiver when reaching an age of sexual maturity are legion on BYC. He's just very confused by his earlier imprinting and you may or may not be able to reverse his behavior...time to remove him from your flock. You have too many roosters for the amount of hens you have anyway, so it might be a good idea to remove all but 2 of these roosters or you will start to see some hens with bald backs from overbreeding. Not a good thing.

    http://www.usask.ca/wcvm/herdmed/applied-ethology/Bottle-raised males can be very dangerous.pdf

    Quote:
    avian and mammalian neonates are born with a preprogrammed drive to imprint onto
    their mother. Imprinting refers to a critical
    period of time early in the animal’s life when
    it forms attachments and develops a concept
    of its own species’ identity. Imprinting
    provides animals with information about who they are and for males it determines
    specifically who they will find attractive when they reach sexual maturity.
    Only a few
    species like cow birds and cuckoos
    , that are essentially parasites in another bird’s nest,
    can be reared by surrogate parents and ge
    t things “right” when they reach sexual
    maturity. The famous German ethologist, K
    onrad Lorenz demonstrated the imprinting
    process in goslings and ducklings and showed
    that in the absence of their real mothers
    these precocial birds would imprin
    t onto their human care taker.
    Imprinting has long lasting and important bi
    ological and psychological effects on adult
    sexual behaviour, which is often irreversible

    . Males that have been imprinted onto
    another species tend to court th
    e surrogate species that raised them.

    Quote:
    ve bouts of male aggression
    that he will direct against
    his human “competition”. Male aggression is a normal part of sexual behaviour
     
  4. abikalyss

    abikalyss Just Hatched

    29
    0
    14
    Jun 6, 2016
    Virginia
    We keep roosters separate from hens except the ones we want to breed (to prevent inbreeding) no hens are getting over bred. And does this problem happen before sexual maturity?
     
  5. Beekissed

    Beekissed True BYC Addict

    Most start to notice the increased aggression around the time the cockerel is 5-6 mo. of age and beyond.
     

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