Rooster behavior

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by CluckThis, Apr 9, 2009.

  1. CluckThis

    CluckThis Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 25, 2008
    Arlington, Washington
    Does anyone know if you caponize a rooster will they be less aggresive towards us humans? Is so when does it need to be done????
    [​IMG]
     
  2. mediazeal

    mediazeal Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 26, 2009
    Will that make him not crow?

    Is he a pet?
     
  3. MoodyChicken

    MoodyChicken Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 15, 2009
    Northern California
    Yes indeed. Some capons mellow so much that they will even hatch and brood chicks. They will crow, but far less. It's best to do it before they mature, just like a stallion or other male animal. Their feathers will become very long and pretty if caponized.
     
  4. Sock Puppet

    Sock Puppet Grumpy Hen

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    Mar 3, 2009
    Mesa, Arizona
    Quote:Ive never heard of this. How is it done, just curious.
     
  5. MoodyChicken

    MoodyChicken Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:It's a pretty risky surgery, but when done right you'll have either a deliciously tender meat bird or a very mellow rooster. Capons grow larger too. It's just like neutering that overly playful puppy or that psycho stallion. Not sure on the exact procedure, but basically you restrain the bird on its side on a table. Make a small incision in between the second and third ribs (I think) and remove the testicles. Sometimes both testicles can be removed from the same side, other times you have to flip the bird and remove the other one from the other side. But you have to be super careful.... there's a major artery right where you're working, you have to know what the testes and the kidneys look like (don't mix them up!), and you'll be working near the spine. So all those considered... practice on a bird you're willing to lose first. Good news, if you happen to hit the artery the bird can be dressed and eaten, so no waste. After it heals, the newly neutered bird will take on the genderless "poullard" type (I think that's what it's called) which results in male coloring and longer softer feathers. Neutered females will take on the poullard plumage too. [​IMG]
     
  6. Sock Puppet

    Sock Puppet Grumpy Hen

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    Mar 3, 2009
    Mesa, Arizona
    Wow, that is interesting [​IMG]
     
  7. Malibufarmer

    Malibufarmer Out Of The Brooder

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    if you dont mind me asking a Q, i have only seen my roo mate with my hens 2 times, i only watch them 30 min a day. Do u think he breeds with them or not?
     
  8. BorderKelpie

    BorderKelpie Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 1, 2009
    outside Dallas
    I think it's Storey's book of poultry that goes into pretty good detail on caponizing. (I think that's the name - it's the orange book, if that helps)
     
  9. KattyKillFish

    KattyKillFish Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 8, 2009
    Dillingham, Alaska
    Quote:I would be pretty sure he does, but roos also have favorite hens and hens that might never be visited by him. I think mine like to do it out of sight, because i've never seen them mate but always end up with fertile eggs. i spend most of the day with my flock, too. at least 3 hours.
    i think he does.

    anyhow, i hear caponizing (spelling?) mandatory for some bird shows which is really odd because if you have a prize-winning roo, how are you going to get those excellent genes to future generations?
     
    Last edited: Apr 10, 2009
  10. CluckThis

    CluckThis Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 25, 2008
    Arlington, Washington
    Old Roo is in refrig after attackin me the other night. 26 baby in brooder and I know that there is at least 2 roos in there. The hens seen a bit lost without thier roo to direct them, but there has only been 2 days that I have taken them out since the attack. Hubby was planning on keeping new roos in a pen of thier own so we wouldn't have the re-play of the other night. My thought was when you neuter a dog they seem to calm down a bit, would it work the same for a roo.
     

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