Rooster black comb/lethargic

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by jenjack72, Mar 6, 2016.

  1. jenjack72

    jenjack72 Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 12, 2015
    We got an 8 month old rooster given to us a week ago. When we first got him, i noticed the tips of his comb were black which i thought maybe had been from frostbite. Since then, his comb has become more black and he has a couple spots on his waddle. He is not active at all and his tail feathers are droopy. I had posted in another thread about him being bullied by my hens, but they dont mind him now. I have no idea whats wrong with the little guy and im worried that something is really wrong with him. He is eating and drinking fine. Any ideas what could be going on??
     
  2. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive True BYC Addict Premium Member

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    Can you post a couple of pictures of his comb? Are having cold weather now? Can you bring him in to get warm, and offer him some wet feed and a bit of egg or tuna? Look at his droppings and check him for lice and mites, especially in front of his cents, under wings, around neck. Is he being kept from feed by the others? He could be dehydrated, or he could have been exposed to a new strain of coccidiosis in the soil. Worms or a crop problem could also be possibilities. But if he has frostbite, he may be in a lot of pain. How do his feet look?
     
  3. jenjack72

    jenjack72 Out Of The Brooder

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    I will post some pics tomorrow. Our weather hasnt been too cold...lows in the 20s so I don't think it's frostbite. He is eating really good, as well as drinking. My hens are all very healthy, so that makes me think it's not mites or anything he would have gotten from moving into our coop (I'll check him again tomorrow). His feet look good. He's just so sweet. I hope he's ok.
     
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2016
  4. jenjack72

    jenjack72 Out Of The Brooder

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    Took this pic of him this morning. [​IMG]
     
  5. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive True BYC Addict Premium Member

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    The picture is not the greatest, but it could be some frostbite in the rear comb. It also may be from pecking, perhaps by another rooster from his previous home. it's always a good idea to quarantine a new chicken for at least 30 days to watch for signs of illness, look them over for lice and mites (under the vent, under wings, around neck) and possibly worm them. Mites can cause black crusting in the comb. Pecking causing bleeding which turns black.
     
  6. jenjack72

    jenjack72 Out Of The Brooder

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    I'm wondering if it's from pecking. My girls were not nice to him at all for the first few days and kept attacking him. Hopefully that's all it is. I know new birds need to be incubated, that's totally on me. I didn't have anywhere to put him other than with the hens and probaby should have figured out a plan. I'm still new at this. Thanks for the input!
     
  7. nightowl223

    nightowl223 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    If the already established hens were pecking at him, that is almost certainly dried blood. It would also explain his lethargy, as roosters can actually be "heartbroken" if they are not allowed to be the dominant alpha, as roosters are genetically wired to be. [​IMG] I've personally had it happen, and learned my lesson, years ago. He actually lost all interest in eating and drinking, and I had to slowly nurse him back to health, then slowly, one at a time, re-introduce him to other chickens, starting with the most timid and quiet ones. It was quite a learning experience! So make sure this fellow is eating and drinking normally!

    If you plan to add other chickens at any time, a large dog carrier or crate would be a good investment - and they can be had, at thrift shops or on craigslist, etc., for a decent price. Keep new birds in the crate for 30 days, to watch for any hidden problems or diseases. Also always care for your existing flock first, and then any new birds - then wash up very good (and it's even a good idea to change clothes) afterwards, too. It can save a world of heartache that could happen if you put a diseased bird with your flock, or even accidentally transfer dangerous germs from the new bird to your flock, thereby losing all of them. [​IMG] I've known friends that learned that lesson the hard way, too.

    The best trick I've found to integrate new birds into a coop of already established birds (after the 30 day quarantine), as strange as it sounds, involves garlic powder. [​IMG] Get an extra-large jar of it, sprinkle the entire coop with it, and all of your birds (under wings, on back & work it down through their feathers to their skin, etc), including the new one. Then, after dark, once everyone's gone to bed, put the new chook in on the roost next to the others (with as little light as possible, so everyone stays calm). The garlic smell covers any scent differences, so they don't immediately figure out the newly introduced chicken doesn't "belong" to the flock, and moving the new one at night allows everyone to wake up together, and it seems their little minds just assume the new bird was always there. [​IMG] LOL, I know it sounds silly, but I have successfully integrated many new chickens to multiple different coops that way, with virtually zero trouble! The only time I had any problem was when a new roo thought he could take over before the old rooster was willing to step down. [​IMG] That could have happened in any situation where a maturing roo was in the same coop as a much older rooster, though. [​IMG]

    Sorry if I sound like I'm lecturing, but I like to be honest, even blunt, because that's what I would prefer others do to me. Honesty is the best policy, even if it comes off as blunt or overly-dramatic. I am only trying to do my best to offer the best advice I can.

    I hope your fella has finally started to integrate himself with everyone! And, if those spots are still there, it wouldn't hurt to put some triple antibiotic ointment on them. Be sure it's not the type with pain reliever in it, though, as that can sicken or even kill a chicken. They're very sensitive to many types of pain medication, especially the "....caine" kinds, and the antibiotic ointment with pain reliever has one of the dangerous kinds!
     
  8. jenjack72

    jenjack72 Out Of The Brooder

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    Thank you for all your input! He is actually looking better this morning. He came running with the hens when he saw me and one of my more dominant girls tried pecking at him and he charged at her...so looks like he's starting to stand up for himself. I was thinking that he might be depressed because he misses his old flock that he came from, maybe that's why he looks lethargic. .? He's a sweet boy,I really hope he keeps doing better! :)
     
  9. nightowl223

    nightowl223 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    That sounds like a very good sign! [​IMG] LOL, I never would have believed that depression happens in roosters until I saw it with my own eyes! Him standing up for himself against a bullying hen is a real positive; it means he's gaining his "swagger" back. [​IMG] A few more suggestions you could try are adding some ACV (apple cider vinegar with mother in it, unfiltered, unpasteurized) to their water, about one tablespoon per gallon, which is a good "pick-me-up" for them, and giving them some dry catfood as treats, which has a high level of protein. Also, plain yogurt is a great treat for them, too. All of these can help support and strengthen a lethargic chicken, and still benefit everyone else in the flock, too.

    I hope he continues to get better! [​IMG]
     
  10. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive True BYC Addict Premium Member

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    It's good to hear that he is feeling better.
     

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