Rooster Dilemma

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by RMBGKY, Sep 26, 2011.

  1. RMBGKY

    RMBGKY Out Of The Brooder

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    Nov 29, 2010
    Bowling Green, KY
    I have 16 hens and 2 roosters all 20 weeks old. The hens are now laying a few eggs, but when they get in full swing I will have eggs to sell or give away. The problem is that many of the people who want the eggs (including my wife) do not want fertilized eggs. Either they are vegetarian or just don't like the idea of the egg being a potential embryo. I mainly have the rooster to hear him crow. I may raise chicks and I may not. My question is what can I do with the roosters so I can control whether I have fertilized eggs or not? Isolation seems to be the only solution, but I wasn't crazy about the work and expense of a second coop and run. I could split the current coop and run, but it is just enough for the 18 together.

    Any ideas would be welcome.
     
  2. cubalaya

    cubalaya Overrun With Chickens

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    fertilized eggs taste the same as non fertilized eggs. i would sell my eggs to less picky people.
     
  3. frostbite

    frostbite Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 27, 2011
    Fairbanks, Alaska
    When you look at them in the carton, how can you tell whether they're fertilized or unfertilized? If they're fresh and immediately refrigerated, how is anyone going to know even when they crack them open? What if you just call them eggs? I suppose if someone asks, you could tell them. Are these picky people vegetarians? Tell them that they're all fertilized, but are doomed to be roosters, which will have to be culled anyway, and it's more humane to eat them as eggs before they have the ability to experience fear and pain...
     
  4. henney penny

    henney penny Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Northern Maine
    If they are refridgerated them nothing is growing
     
  5. Lollipop

    Lollipop Chillin' With My Peeps

    Quote:Funny post, frosty, LOL
    Good for you RMBGKY, I like to hear a rooster crow also. My thoughts on the fertile egg delimma, about the same as cubalaya. You only have 16 hens. Surely there are enough sensible people willing to buy fresh eggs so that you don`t have to worry about pleasing the sqeemish ones. As the others have said, just sell farm fresh eggs and don`t bring up the subject. I don`t consider them potential embryos until incubation has commenced. And, as mentioned, nobody can tell the difference, by taste, and most folks can`t tell by looking at a cracked egg. Ya just can`t please all the people all the time. Sell your eggs to those who will appriciate them.......Pop
     
  6. RMBGKY

    RMBGKY Out Of The Brooder

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    Nov 29, 2010
    Bowling Green, KY
    Some of those picky people are my wife and family. I am not concerned about finding a market for my eggs. Between me and my dogs we can eat them all. But, I am finding more people won't knowingly eat fertilized eggs than will. My main question is if you were in my situation how could you control the fertilization of your eggs. It would be interesting for those that do sell eggs to start labeling them as fertilized or not and see how the market reacts.
     
  7. IRChicken

    IRChicken Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 20, 2011
    Fertilised eggs last longer in storage than infertile eggs by about a month.
    Mother Earth's News has an article on long term egg storage.
    Apparently, fertilisation improves egg qualities all around.

    Ask your family how much did they like those free range eggs they used to buy at the market and can they tell if they were fertile or infertile?
    Free range eggs could easily be fertile. No, you'll never know if it's fertile or not.

    Cheers
     
  8. frostbite

    frostbite Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Fairbanks, Alaska
    Have you tried selling them to local organic grocers? Around here, they'll pay for fresh eggs. I don't think they ask or even care if they're fertilized or not.
     
  9. Lollipop

    Lollipop Chillin' With My Peeps

    Quote:To much information for the uninformed, RMBGKY. Look what is happening with the animal rights groups. The blind leads the blind. But the answer to your question is right before your eyes. Pen the rooster alone, or with a couple hens, or dispose of him. If your wife and family won`t eat your eggs, buy them some at the store. They`ll be able to see the difference in the pan and taste the difference also. It`s not because yours are fertile, but if it was, they might prefer the fertile egg anyway. My wife is also sqeamish about eating our eggs. She sez they`re pets. But she will eat them in baked goods, etc. as long as she doesn`t have to look at them in the pan. Fine, eat your cereal is my responce. Don`t make this harder than it is. We`re on your side.........Pop
     
  10. blefky

    blefky life in the yard

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    Mar 18, 2010
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    Quote:Somewhere on the forum there's a thread devoted to hatching Trader Joe's eggs. Lot's of people are eating fertilized eggs and just aren't aware. Took me a while to spot the bullseye even when I was actively anticipating it! It's been my experience that people usually think blood spots indicate fertilization - they're not going to notice a tiny white bullseye. It never ceases to amaze me how people aren't disgusted by commercially produced products, but a single sperm sends them into convulsions.[​IMG]
     

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