Rooster experts, tell me I'm just imagining this

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by gritsar, Jul 26, 2008.

  1. gritsar

    gritsar Cows, Chooks & Impys - OH MY!

    28,907
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    Nov 9, 2007
    SW Arkansas
    Okay, my alpha roo, Zeus, has been the boss from day one. He crowed at 10 weeks old. My other roo, Thor, is pretty low on the totem pole, has been strangely quiet, and has always deferred to Zeus.
    Lately Zeus has been getting too big for his britches and I've had to give him a few hard lessons about who is really in charge around here. While teaching Zeus that he's not the big **** he thinks he is, I've also been spending more time with Thor and I can see him getting braver day by day. Now Thor is finally crowing. I think it's because I've knocked Zeus down in the pecking order a bit. Am I imagining it?
     
  2. spook

    spook Chillin' With My Peeps

    no, I don't believe your wrong at all. Zues (sp) has the alpha male position and when it does change, you need to be prepared for the possibility of blood. Also, I have seen 2 roos living in the same area and one has more girls, then the other one may win one or two over and its entertaining.
    You need to read a link about how roosters are hard wired, everything is automatic. My opinion is that your rooster needs to realize YOU are the alpha in the flock. If he is harming a hen, don't hurt him, but flick him off with your hand, he should not be mating with YOUR girls. Also, if either one goes to charge you, take the time to stare him down. This is who is alpha or you have bothered one of his girls and you need to remind him that those are YOUR girls.
    Don't flap your hands, but don't turn around and leave him or he has won that battle. Stand there, if he comes towards you, he is playing "chicken" to see if you will run. When you do not move, it intimidates him to realize he cannot have his way at something.
    Never be cruel and hit, kick or take away water and food (I know you probably wouldnt' anyways, but for anyone that does and reads it) do not harm your roos or girls. If you are having major isses with a roo, perhaps you could send him out, I did that with mine and with older hens they taught him to not be to rough.
    Good luck and you will have a flock with beautiful hens and roos! (I am not an expert, others are, but this is what I do)
     
  3. gritsar

    gritsar Cows, Chooks & Impys - OH MY!

    28,907
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    Nov 9, 2007
    SW Arkansas
    Yes, I read rooster-red's page on roosters and some other info. I found on the internet for dealing with a difficult roo. I don't allow him to mate the girls in front of me at all anymore and if he gets too bossy I pick him up and require him to remain perfectly still before I turn him loose. I also don't allow him to be the first to get to the treats. I chase him just like he used to chase the others. He's coming around to my way of thinking. He does still bite me from time to time, not pecks but actual bites. So we're still working on it and I can be very stubborn. It's my fault for initially spoiling him, but as I said he's coming around.
    Mainly I'm just glad that Thor is finally sticking up for himself. He's actually a better roo as far as his behavior with the hens and how he watches closely for predators.
    P.S. My hens show a definite preference for Thor. Zeus' bullish behavior has cost him friends.
     

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