Rooster Feed

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering Your Flock' started by CLutze27, Feb 14, 2017.

  1. CLutze27

    CLutze27 Just Hatched

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    So as i was browsing through the wonderful world of Backyard Chickens and it occurred to me that i have a roo in my flock. And while it isn't "new" to me that he is a roo, what i hadn't thought of before was what i am feeding my flock. Ive been feeding all of them layer feed. But i noticed something in another post that said something to the effect that layer feed can be bad for birds that aren't lying, as there is too much calcium in the feed. SO i guess my question is what should i be feeding my whole flock so that the hens get a balanced diet with enough calcium (I do have oyster shell and grit in separate feeders readily available), as well as a balanced diet for the roo?

    Also i was curious as to scratch grains, does everyone just buy a store bought mix? or do you have a favorite blend that you mix on your own?
     
  2. Ol Grey Mare

    Ol Grey Mare One egg shy of a full carton. ..... Premium Member

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    The simplest solution that provides a diet appropriate for all members of a mixed flock is to use a ration meant for all life stages - you can use all flock, flock raiser, a grower ration, etc - this meets the nutritional needs of all the birds without overloading any of them on unneeded things like the calcium. This is the approach many, myself included, take. The other advantage, imo, is that the above mentioned feeds tend to offer a better protein content than a lot of the layer rations out there and I prefer the higher protein (18-20% is what these feeds offer vs the 14-16% of most of the layer formualtions)
     
  3. dekel18042

    dekel18042 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    X2 If you do this you can offer a bowl of oyster shells or calcium on the side so it is available to those who need it.
     
  4. bostick18

    bostick18 Out Of The Brooder

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    I think the chicken food is a very tricky topic. Some people sware up and down that Purina layena makes their chickens lay more eggs. I think my chickens lay more eggs when I let them roam my yard. It reduces their feed intake by about half.

    Overall I have seen almost no difference in egg production between different brands of laying pellets. I agree with mare that chickens should have more protein then they are given.. in a perfect world I would feed my chickens 40% lay pellets 20% QUALITY scratch. 40% game rooster feed. Although game bird feed is expensive

    I say quality because not all scratch is the same.. whole corn and a whole grain from a local grain mill in my opinion make the best scratch. While whole grains are better for you they are also better for your birds. It's a more complete food. Like eating the white and yolk of an egg instead of just one or the other.

    Good luck. Don't worry too much. If your on this site asking questions about how to better care for your birds they are probably in very good.
     
  5. bostick18

    bostick18 Out Of The Brooder

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  6. bostick18

    bostick18 Out Of The Brooder

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    I have seen guys feed their birds nothing but whole rice with the husks and their birds grow and develop normally and lay lots of eggs with tough shells. Lol. It's really about how much you want to spend on formulated chicken pellet food. Just because you spend a lot doesn't always mean that your birds will be healthier happy or more productive.
     
  7. dekel18042

    dekel18042 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I think a lot depends on where you live and if your birds can free range get what they need. Mine always have access to high quality food but my birds free range and in the summer have access to all kinds of bugs and worms (protein) and plants and eat very little of what I provide. This winter has been milder than expected and they are out every day scratching and are eating less than I would expect them to.
    The younger birds from late last spring are all laying and the older ones have recovered from their molt and I am getting lots of eggs.
     

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