Rooster ill-Worms?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by new chickie, Mar 6, 2007.

  1. new chickie

    new chickie Out Of The Brooder

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    I have a rooster approx. 7=8months old(americana) who started acting funny. He was all puffed up and his tail feathers hanging low. I seperated him, put him under a heat lamp with food and water. He is eating and drinking. His poop the first day looked like he ate a whole bunch of hay,(spagehitti like) but I am guessing Worms??

    What type of wormer should I use? I have DE I can put on food, will that be enough?
     
  2. dlhunicorn

    dlhunicorn Human Encyclopedia

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    you need to get a faecal (or post a pic here to help you identify... most wormers are very specific in which worms they are effective against)...
     
  3. Barnyard Dawg

    Barnyard Dawg Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Roundworms or ascarids are visible to the naked eye, looking like fine spaghetti. Sometimes after deworming they will be visible in the droppings. Adult female roundworms lay 1000's of eggs per day. These eggs must develop outside the bird for about two weeks for them to be infectious. Moisture and warmth is required for them to develop. These eggs, with the larva inside, are swallowed in dust that is inhaled or from the droppings or dust that settles in the water or the feed. These larva hatches in the stomach then eat though the stomach wall and crawl around inside the bird, especially the liver. Normally this doesn't cause a problem. Eventually they make it back to the intestine and molt into adults.
     
  4. Barnyard Dawg

    Barnyard Dawg Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Roundworms or ascarids are visible to the naked eye, looking like fine spaghetti. Sometimes after deworming they will be visible in the droppings. Adult female roundworms lay 1000's of eggs per day. These eggs must develop outside the bird for about two weeks for them to be infectious. Moisture and warmth is required for them to develop. These eggs, with the larva inside, are swallowed in dust that is inhaled or from the droppings or dust that settles in the water or the feed. These larva hatches in the stomach then eat though the stomach wall and crawl around inside the bird, especially the liver. Normally this doesn't cause a problem. Eventually they make it back to the intestine and molt into adults.

    The adults live in the intestinal space. It takes about 1-2 months for a fresh egg to turn into an adult old enough to lay eggs. However no dewormer kills at the larva stages developing in the bird. Eggs will be found in the feces much sooner than 30-60 days. A mild infection is not a serious problem but a severe infection can result in starvation and death. Young birds just out of the nest are most susceptible. Some of the birds will be carriers and shed eggs, but no sickness will result. A nutritional problem or stress from other disease can trigger worm problems. Also a worm infection can bring a bird down just enough that it will get sick from something else.
     
  5. Barnyard Dawg

    Barnyard Dawg Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Prevention is obviously a clean dry coop to prevent the eggs from developing. I will also clean the dropping from the coop daily so they are not exposed to them. I feed my chickens (DE) Diatomaceous Earth daily and add raw natural apple cider vinegar to their water and started dusting Sweet PDZ in the coop and pen along with DE. Worms can develop resistance to the dewormers that is why I try to treat my birds naturally and daily instead of once a month. Good Luck
     
  6. Wes in Tx

    Wes in Tx Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Since it sounds like your birds have a bad case of worms then I suggest a mild wormer such as Wazine. You will need to give this every 10 days for a couple months to break the cycle.
     

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