Rooster Problems

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by RedneckRebel, Jun 25, 2013.

  1. RedneckRebel

    RedneckRebel Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 24, 2013
    Eastern Kentucky
    I have a rooster that is causing me problems by viciously attacking and in one case has killed a chicken, put a hole in another, and continues to strip others of their feathers, I'm the only thing he fears, what do I need to do in order to keep him?
     
  2. In your description you state that the rooster is "vicious" and killed another chicken. There is one really good solution to a rooster like that. It's the stew pot. The solution is actually pretty simple. And the benefit of homegrown chicken is great. If you are personally not able to do the deed get a family member or friend to help you out.

    Wish ya the best.
     
  3. RedneckRebel

    RedneckRebel Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 24, 2013
    Eastern Kentucky
    That's my second option, if I take the rooster out and isolate it by itself for a week will it be at the bottom of the pecking order? I really need this one for breeding purposes, only Delaware roo I have found around my area, I have no problems killing it, I've been slaughtering my own meat for awhile, about 3 years now
     
  4. foxy2320

    foxy2320 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You could always try isolating it, the worst it would do would be to prolong the culling a week if you decide to go that route. If he's friendly with you, I saw a post on here that another person made a fool of the rooster to knock him down a few pegs, dancing around with him in his arms and trying to "shame" him so to speak. I know it sounds crazy, but the original post had some merit to it, I swear! I'll see if I can find it for you.
     
  5. foxy2320

    foxy2320 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oct 15, 2012
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  6. RedneckRebel

    RedneckRebel Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 24, 2013
    Eastern Kentucky
    Thank you, the funny part is I try to shame him, the roo is nonaggressive to me, but is very petrified of me
     
  7. foxy2320

    foxy2320 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Well, best of luck to you, maybe someone with some more experience will cluck in. I think I've lucked out...I had a flock of ten total, and two were roos, so I had two roos to 8 hens, and everyone says that's way too small a ratio. Now we're down to two roos, seven hens running around and one broody and things are still okay. I've never been attacked, the worst they do is try to peck at my rings or my shoes if the light catches them. But we have six two-month-olds that joined the flock a few weeks ago, and the broody should hatch out in 7-12 days(ish) (I say ish because I have no idea when she started setting, I just thought she was laying the same time every day!). So chances are we'll end up with a few more roos!
     
  8. RedneckRebel

    RedneckRebel Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 24, 2013
    Eastern Kentucky
    Thanks, I plan on asking my neighbor or when I get the chance, she has had over 50 years of experience with this stuff, so I'll ask her opinion tomorrow
     
  9. WalkingOnSunshine

    WalkingOnSunshine Overrun With Chickens

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    This is a case for the stew pot.

    Aggression is, in a large part, genetic. If you use this rooster for a flock rooster, you will have problems with his offspring. This is not a good candidate for breeding.

    With a bird this aggressive, I don't think putting him in a cage for a while will work. This sometimes works for hens, but I've seen roosters be incredibly aggressive in getting back to the top of the pecking order. I think he might cause even more damage on the way back to being alpha.
     
    Last edited: Jun 26, 2013
  10. RedneckRebel

    RedneckRebel Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 24, 2013
    Eastern Kentucky
    He seems to be okay sometimes, and other times he is very aggressive, even picking on the hens
     

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