rooster question and broody questions

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by okiemamachick, Jan 21, 2015.

  1. okiemamachick

    okiemamachick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I hope this is the right forum for this lol ok I have a total of 6 hens as of right now and zero roosters every rooster we've had has been ornery and floggy and therefore couldn't stay. I would really like to keep a rooster for breeding purposes, perhaps in his own coop/tractor? is this done? if it is, how would I go about getting my hens bred? put them in one at a time or put him in with them for a certain amount of time? After Im sure the deed is done how long until the eggs are fertile? Do I just stop collecting and see if one goes broody? If none go broody are the eggs ruined or can I incubate them? how long do I have before they are unhatchable? Im not a newbie to chickens ive just never dealt with the breeding aspect of chickens before so this part is fairly foreign to me. any advice would be a great help!
     
  2. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Chicken Obsessed

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    It's usually about 2 or three eggs after the deed is done before they're fertile.
    There are sperm storage sites in the vagina. After the next egg passes, some of the sperm is squeezed out and makes its way to the infundibulum where, once present, will fertilize the next ovum released.
    A hen may never go broody. You can tell if the eggs are fertile by opening it and looking for the germinal disc. If it is a white spot, it's infertile. If it's a halo, it's fertile.
    http://www.extension.org/pages/65971/germinal-disc

    Conjugal visits work. It depends on what works best for you.
    Once mated a hen will be fertile for about 3 weeks, more or less.

    Do you have a breed choice?

    I've had lots of roosters and been flogged by a few that tasted just like chicken.

    My advice is a breed that is more aloof and doesn't feel comfortable around people.

    I raise Black Penedesencas. They're great flock protectors and I've never been flogged by one.
     
  3. DylansMom

    DylansMom RIP 1969-2017

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    The ornery and floggy roos, did you raise them or get them as older birds? We have 2 and before getting them I did lots of research on here regarding behavior modification. I was very consistant while they were growing up and made sure to catch each one and carry it around like a baby with me usually for 20-30 minutes not every day but pretty often. I would catch them and hold them on their backs on my lap as I had my morning coffee as well. Just every chance I got I'd grab 'em. I told my DH he should do the same, but he thought I was nuts. I have 2 big pretty roos now that have never once challenged me, they will put themselves in front of visitors and my hubby, but not me, the moment I walk in their direction they make themselves scarce. I am quite pleased with how they behave and allow them to free range 100% of the time. Seems penning would be a bit of a pain, and then you lose the benefit of the roos protecting your hens. Both got frostbitten wattles last week and I had to bring them in and stand them on the kitchen counter for first aid treatments and they behaved so well even hubby grudgingly admitted to being impressed. It can be done, but it requires a bit of a commitment, so it is up to you if you want to do that.
    [​IMG]

    Naptime. [​IMG]
     
  4. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Chicken Obsessed

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    I think that would work but I don't have the time or inclination.

    Another thing to consider is that roosters attack predators or other roosters. Attacking roosters may think you are one of the above. Predators move fast and other roosters don't bring treats. Bringing treats and moving slowly around the flock works for me also.
     
  5. okiemamachick

    okiemamachick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I raised them but I didn't Cottle them perhaps ii should have but there aren't enough hours in the day sometimes. Thanks for all the information. About the conjugal visits that may be the way I go then. Anyone have any advice on the moving of a hen and her eggs as well as integration back into the flock etc.
     
  6. DylansMom

    DylansMom RIP 1969-2017

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    I wasn't actually recommending coddling for them. By catching and holding them on their back you are putting them in a submissive position. They hate it, but you are teaching them in no uncertain terms that you are the biggest baddest bird in the flock and you will do with them whatever you please. When I would grab them if they flapped and carried on I just grabbed their legs and let them dangle upside down until they got tired then tucked them in the crook of my arm and did chores. To some that probably would have appeared a bit cruel, but I do think it is all about pecking order and making them think that it isn't worth it to challenge you for dominance.
     
  7. okiemamachick

    okiemamachick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I see what you're saying now thanks for the clarification.
     
  8. Mrs. K

    Mrs. K Overrun With Chickens

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    This is how I do it, it might work for you. I don't think you listed your breeds of chickens, but I am a bit worried, as it sounded like you had not had a broody hen. Some breeds go broody, some strongly tend not to, it is however, dependent on the individual bird. The neighbor's first broody hen was a leghorn! Exposing them to roosters does not influence broodiness in the least.

    If you get a broody hen, contact someone locally or order eggs from the site here. Put those under your broody, and when they hatch them, some of those will be male. IF you raise them up in the flock, those older hens will teach them some manners, and then pick your best, and keep him with the flock, and hatch as you want.

    Separate pens always seem to double the work.
    Mrs K
     

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