1. If this is your first time on BYC, we suggest you start with one of these three options:
    Raising Chickens Chicken Coops Join BYC
    If you're already a member of our community, click here to login & click here to learn what's new!

Rooster question

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by bren7878, Jun 30, 2016.

  1. bren7878

    bren7878 Just Hatched

    12
    0
    12
    Jun 15, 2016
    We have 8 chicken 3 turned out to be roos. 2 barred rock and a road island red.. My husband was thinking about keeping two roos bc one of the barred rocks the dominant roo but the red is pretty lol they were raised all together will two roos be to many for 5 hens?
     
  2. Pyxis

    Pyxis Dark Sider Premium Member

    11,189
    4,226
    466
    Mar 27, 2012
    Vermont
    My Coop
    Yes, that will be too many. At most you want one rooster per five hens, and even then you may need more hens depending on how amorous the rooster is.
     
  3. Folly's place

    Folly's place Overrun With Chickens

    7,251
    1,547
    356
    Sep 13, 2011
    southern Michigan
    Welcome! Get more pullets/ hens, or plan to end up with one cock. Watch your cockrels, and select the one(s) that are polite and respectful of humans, and not hurting the pullets. If things are calm, you might be able to keep two for a while, but come spring, one will be plenty! Hatchery RIRs, and Rocks, can be pretty aggressive, so time will tell. Temperment is the most important thing!!! Mary
     
  4. chickens really

    chickens really Overrun With Chickens

    It usually is one Rooster to 10 hens..Then you need to consider the coop size if introducing more to the flock...Chickens get mean if over crowded. Fighting, feather pecking and loss in egg production.
    I would pick one if you need a Rooster?
     
  5. GOLDENSEABRIGHT

    GOLDENSEABRIGHT Chillin' With My Peeps

    460
    23
    93
    Mar 4, 2014
    Well in my many years of this same situation, I have seen it just fine to have two roos; however, if you decide to raise any chicks, the probability of the chicks being male rises, as long as you keep the roos together you will be fine. I know that people will say don't do it, but not much harm will be done, yes there will be a couple of fights, but barred rocks tend to be a gentle bird, and so do rhode islands. so in conclusion, with my, and my grandfathers years of expierence, it is completely up to you.
     
  6. Pyxis

    Pyxis Dark Sider Premium Member

    11,189
    4,226
    466
    Mar 27, 2012
    Vermont
    My Coop

    It's not the roosters fighting that is the problem. I keep several pens and have multiple roosters in each. It's the hens getting overmated and injured by too many roosters that's the problem.

    And keeping more than one rooster does not increase the number of male chicks you hatch. Each fertilization the chance is 50/50, just as with humans, except unlike humans, it's the hen's egg that determines the gender, not the rooster's sperm. The rooster actually has nothing to do with determining the sex of the chicks.
     
    3 people like this.
  7. chickens really

    chickens really Overrun With Chickens

    X2
     
  8. GOLDENSEABRIGHT

    GOLDENSEABRIGHT Chillin' With My Peeps

    460
    23
    93
    Mar 4, 2014
    And you tell me this, even if you have one rooster, he still tends to run the hens too much. I have found that they are not overrun if you have a enough room for the hen to get around and escape the roo. Most people over look the fact that there have been many roosters in a small flock of chickens, matter of fact i have also read that it helps protect the hens and a second roo gives a back up rooster,and typically, once the two have assorted dominance, the dominant male will do most of the running just like an alpha. And FYI, the chemical compounds in the enviorment can influence the gender ratio.
     
  9. Pyxis

    Pyxis Dark Sider Premium Member

    11,189
    4,226
    466
    Mar 27, 2012
    Vermont
    My Coop

    My roosters do not overmate my hens because I have a good ratio of hens to roosters. And sure, if you can free range maybe a hen can escape an unwanted mating, but I have seen a rooster sprint full on across a yard to grab a hen and mate her, so even in a free range situation this isn't always true. And most people can't free range their birds anyway.

    And yes, one rooster is dominant in a situation with more than one, and many times I have seen my dominant rooster stop the lower ranking ones from mating a hen - only to mate her right after. Or they allow the mating but stand right next to the pair and then jump on as soon as the lower ranking rooster gets off.

    There is no evidence showing that environmental factors influence the gender of chicks. If you can link me to some studies showing this then I will concede this point to you, but I do not believe there is any evidence saying that this happens. I even did a search of Google Scholar to be sure.
     
    Last edited: Jun 30, 2016
    1 person likes this.
  10. GOLDENSEABRIGHT

    GOLDENSEABRIGHT Chillin' With My Peeps

    460
    23
    93
    Mar 4, 2014
    I am not saying free range, i have pens that are strategically built to allow the hens to have places to get and the rooster can't and in many science books i have read that the environment can influence the ratio, so can temperature, stress levels and nutrient levels. I started researching this when is really got big into chickens and found a few rumors, and believe what you want, these have been true in my hatching. Even older wiser folks say this and so i tried it out, i hatched out six batches, three with only one roo, and three with two roos, my results followed an average of evenly mixed with just one roo, but more males were present with the two roo pen. But advice for the questioner, do not mate brother sister chickens, you will have mutations you do not want, for example, i have a hen that runs in circles and has very weak neck muscles, and her offspring have the same conditions.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by