Rooster Rooster Rooster

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by Farmer Connie, Jun 18, 2017.

  1. Farmer Connie

    Farmer Connie I was claimed in the lost & found box

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    If you buy a dog, tie him to a tree and occasionally interact with him, he will not be as obedient as your neighbor's dog who sits, stays, rolls over, fetches and most of all.. a true companion. But the difference is your neighbor plays and interacts with their doggy a lot.
    Roosters are no different with one exception. They are hardwired to protect their interests and fellow feathered friends.
    If you show fear, they will be taught by habit that they are the alpha. With that habit they will repeat the intimidation factor. The more you avoid your Roo, the more the habit manifests.

    With that said..
    Pick him up after the sun goes down. Repeat this about every other night. Pet the back of his neck. Stroke and gently pinch his back neck. Each night you do this it will get easier and he will be more submissive. Eventually you can gently massage his throat. He will purr when the day comes that he realizes you are not a threat. If you show fear, they know it. If you show it you are his friend not foe, he will realize that eventually.
    Back to the dog thing. If you don't work with him don't expect a perfect dog.

    I have a giant b-rock named pepper. He is my shadow. Goes where I go. Thinks he is a lap dog but dominant to all our other roos. He would kill one of our other roos if the fences weren't in place but gentle as a pussy cat with his handlers.
    We have a buff Roo, 2 Wyandot roos, red Roo, Leghorn Roo, moulted java Roo and 1 Easter Roo. None of them are aggressive towards us unless a stranger comes by and they will charge them. Our Grandson was a target once. Now we have been having interaction with him petting the half asleep roos. So far 2 roos have excepted him.
    there's still time to create a bond if you are dedicated enough.
    Good luck!
     
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  2. CapricornFarm

    CapricornFarm Chicken Tender

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    It makes perfect sense to me. But i have had roos that were still aggressive no matter how much i worked with them.
     
  3. Farmer Connie

    Farmer Connie I was claimed in the lost & found box

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  4. Folly's place

    Folly's place Free Ranging

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    Chickens are not dogs, and won't think the same way. Some roosters (and some dogs, for that matter) are going to be jerks no matter how they're raised. Some will be polite in spite of poor management, and some will be able to modify their behavior with training. I've had many cockerels over the years, and some were impossible! Both genetics and management matter, so selecting the right breeding stock is so important, and then raising them right. Mary
     
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  5. Farmer Connie

    Farmer Connie I was claimed in the lost & found box

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    And lots of interaction. Don't avoid them, cross paths with them. Showing no fear is better than avoiding them. Staying in separate corners maintains the Alpha situation. Ferral cats stay clear, house cats stay near. Building a bond is earned not achieved without commitment. Best to start at an early age before they are dead set in a ferral disposition. My sister calls us the "The Roo Wisperers". Hehe
     
  6. MageofMist

    MageofMist Songster

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    I have experience with "jerk" roosters at a community farm, there was this small gamebird roo called "Killer" due to the fact he attacked anyone who entered his aviary to change the food and water, swooping down at them from his perches.

    I wasn't really allowed in there, but there was a day when the place was short on staff so I was granted permission to fill the food and change the water, and well... I got swooped, and I snatched him out of the air and then held him close and snuggled him right in front of his girls... He never attacked me since after that humiliating moment for him. :p

    There was also a polish rooster who'd attack my ankles when I went in his pen. I either ignored him and walked over him or nudged him out of the way with my foot, or I picked him up and pet him. Eventually he grew calmer around me and started either ignoring me or coming up for treats, depending on his mood.
     
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  7. Farmer Connie

    Farmer Connie I was claimed in the lost & found box

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    Sweet! Interactions are the key. I will wear jeans around problem roos so they can't hurt my legs. I don't flinch! They sense it like a dog would. Then bend over with gloves on if anymore else is intimidated (except you and I) and snatch them up. Hold tight!
    Practice while they are sleeping. Great story and thanks for contributing!
     
  8. MageofMist

    MageofMist Songster

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    I normally wear thick jeans anyways, and I don't use gloves even around problem roos. The moment I hold them, they just sorta... Freeze, as if unable to comprehend the situation they are suddenly in. :p It is adorable. I just cuddle and pet them a little, then put them down and they either run off or sometimes just walk away as if saying "Ok, so THAT was a thing" and continue with whatever they were doing before they started jumping me. :lau

    Some people think I am too fearless around animals, and I kinda agree as I have even walked up to a friend's dog who wasn't really socialized as a pup (wasn't my friend's fault, they adopted him from a shelter and his previous owner didn't train him or socialize him properly) who was growling and barking at me... I sat down, slowly reached out my hand half-way and let him lean in the rest of the way and sniff my hand, I then gave him a treat and scratched under his chin, and me and the dog have been best buds since.

    Wasn't even a small dog, it was a big one. My friend was worried he'd bite me but knew I had a way with animals and so they let me do that. I don't recommend anyone else doing what I did. :p
     
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