Rooster said to be aggressive

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by nlsf, Feb 28, 2017.

  1. nlsf

    nlsf Out Of The Brooder

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    I recently got a year old rooster. The man who gave him to me said he was completely non aggressive. I recently saw on another chicken group I am on that his wife said he was aggressive and that the other two roosters were aggressive as well. I've only have had him for a couple days and haven't had any problems with him so far. However I want to make sure nothing starts. Is there a way I can keep the rooster thinking I'm the head of the flock.
     
  2. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Lots of Chickens Premium Member

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    There are many ways to remain dominant. It's mostly attitude and being confident and not afraid. A rooster will pick up on weakness and hesitation. Move through your flock like he's just another chicken.

    He should always move away from you and shouldn't come towards you. He should remain at least 5 feet back.

    Often young roosters will try out attacking the keeper. If you show fear or back away, it will escalate.

    It's possible the woman was getting attacked because she was frightened and the man wasn't.

    Always keep one eye on him, never give him your back until you are comfortable with his behaviors. Facing you is a dominant behavior, he should always give you his side or back.

    If he does attack there are multiple ways to deal with the behavior. Never run or show fear. Either block him, or get a hold of him. Than you will need to start to dominating him by controlling space and forcing him to move off whenever you are around. Using a tool like a broom, plastic rake, or fishing net can give you the upper hand.

    Some roosters feel frisky in the spring and like to try to dominate their owners, nip it in the bud and your rooster will be an asset, otherwise he will make keeping birds miserable.
     
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  3. chickens really

    chickens really Overrun With Chickens

    What I have learned is never give him a reason to attack you....;).....All Roosters will protect the Hens.....Move slow with no real fast sudden movements and talk along as you do your chores....I sing or talk to my Rooster...He is a great Rooster, although I never trust him...Never turn your back to him.....Kids usually get attacked because they move to fast and are a bit hyper....lol....Not Funny........:(

    You don't need to bully him, you will never win a fight with a Rooster that is attacking you ...He fights till the threat is gone...Meaning you.....:(

    Just keep aware of where he is at all times and I guess respect his house and area your going into...Those are his Hens and his territory your in ..:)

    Cheers!
     
    Last edited: Feb 28, 2017
  4. Toddrick

    Toddrick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    When my cockerels nipped at my toes for the first time I gave them chase for several minutes, and they were submissive to all people after that. If that doesn't work then you might have a worse case scenario, if you know what I mean (live with a mean rooster...or don't).
     
    Last edited: Feb 28, 2017
  5. allosaurusrock

    allosaurusrock Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Another thing. if he shows signs of aggression or dominance, such as trying to attack you or making half circles around you, is to grab him and hold him down on the ground until he stops struggling. It is a dominant stance that roosters (or sometimes other hens) will do to hens when they mate, which is more about showing others who is boss than anything else. Speak to him in his own language.
     
    Last edited: Mar 1, 2017
  6. nlsf

    nlsf Out Of The Brooder

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    Today I let them out to free range for a little. He decided to try and test me i believe as i was measuring out some stuff for my new duck coop. He flew at me with his feet towards me trying to rake me. My first reaction was to kick at him :( which he tried again and this time I blocked him with my foot and chased after him. He immediately started running away. I kept following him for a couple minutes making sure anytime he faced me directly I'd run at him making sure he move away. By the end of it he was staying far away from me and wouldnt face me directly. I think he was just trying to find his place in the flock because he's new. I hope I did the right things. I feel slightly bad about kicking him.
     
  7. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Lots of Chickens Premium Member

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    That's exactly what I do, the kicking is an immediate gut reaction, otherwise I wouldn't kick him. I would go on the offense now, making sure he keeps his distance and back to you. Another tool I use is my plastic coffee can feed scoop which will get tossed at any rooster doing things I don't like. It's a way to reach out and touch him from afar and will give you extra power just by carrying it.

    I am not out daily dominating roosters, mine all behave themselves. Some young ones need reminding in spring. I personally don't let them mate in front of me or when I'm in the shed, because the dominant rooster doesn't allow it either. I take my cues from the chickens.

    After he understands you are top rooster he should stop his trying to dominate and accept he's below you. A sure way to check a roosters acceptance of you being dominant is to pick up a hen who squawk to see if he runs over. He shouldn't, or if he does he should stop when he sees you. He's young and just needs teaching, and time for his raging hormones to calm down and for him to make better decisions.
     
    2 people like this.
  8. allosaurusrock

    allosaurusrock Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Not letting him mate in front of you is a good idea. Good training tip!
     
  9. tmarsh83

    tmarsh83 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    They aren't though.

    They are mine.

    He is here because I allow him to be.

    He defers to me, or he is gone.
     
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  10. lazy gardener

    lazy gardener True BYC Addict

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    Good response. I would immediately defend myself, then go on offensive if a roo challenges. If he's in attack mode, kicking him is not at all out of the question. Usually, a roo's body language can be read, and he can be schooled before it ever comes to that... if you know what to look for. Continue to tutor him in the fine art of human respect.

    I have also tossed something at a misbehaving roo to remind him who's boss. My roo knows his name. And if he's charging a hen to breed her, all I have to do is say, "Jack, NO!" and take a step towards him. He will immediately decide he has somewhere else to be.

     

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