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Rooster suddenly looks like this? What is it?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by dfleener, Oct 30, 2015.

  1. dfleener

    dfleener New Egg

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    Oct 27, 2015
    [​IMG]
     
  2. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    He appears to have a significant case of fowl pox, a virus spread by mosquitoes. Most chickens recover in 2-3 weeks, but secondary infections in the eyes, or wet (diphtheritic) pox, which involve lesions in the mouth, trachea, esophagus, or lungs, can make it painful to eat, or cause obstruction. Since your rooster has some scabs near his eye, I would apply some Vetericyn Eye Gel, Eye Wash, or Terramycin eye ointment from a feed store to his eye twice daily. Here is some info to read:
    https://www.backyardchickens.com/a/avian-pox-how-to-treat-your-chickens-for-avian-pox
    http://www.michigan.gov/dnr/0,1607,7-153-10370_12150_12220-26362--,00.html
    http://www.hyline.com/aspx/redbook/redbook.aspx?s=5&p=35
    http://www.thepoultrysite.com/publications/6/diseases-of-poultry/195/fowl-pox/
     
  3. Wyandottes7

    Wyandottes7 Overrun With Chickens

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    This looks like Fowl Pox to me. Fowl pox is a viral disease carried by mosquitoes that causes lesions and scabs on the combs, face, and sometimes other bare areas of chickens. It isn't usually deadly or serious, unless it is the "wet" form, which invades the trachea. This looks like the "dry" form. The disease will run its course in about 4-6 weeks. To help the scabs go away, you can dab them with iodine. Make sure the bird stays as stress-free as possible (plenty of good food, water, and space).

    Here's a good article on Fowl Pox for further reading:

    https://www.backyardchickens.com/a/avian-pox-how-to-treat-your-chickens-for-avian-pox

    Good luck with your chicken! If it stays the dry form, he should be fine in a few weeks unless a secondary infection forms or it severely impacts his ability to eat and drink.

    *I guess Eggcessive beat me to the post.[​IMG] *
     
    Last edited: Oct 30, 2015
  4. dfleener

    dfleener New Egg

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    Oct 27, 2015
    We are also going to treat him for fleas/parasites our dogs came back from the groomer yesterday and we were informed they had fleas..... I actually have grown really attached to this bird we are even planning on getting him a mate, would it be a good idea to wait on that though?
     
  5. Zinniah

    Zinniah Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I think you should wait. I'm not sure how long, probably quite a while you should wait. Also the rooster should have a few females, so you might not even want to get him one. He could mount her to much and take off her feathers and injure her. Though you can buy her a chicken saddle.
     
  6. Sonya9

    Sonya9 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Standard roosters typically need 5 or more grown hens. If you put immature pullets in with them the girls could get hurt. If you only put a couple of hens in with him the roosters very often over-breed the hens and tear all of the feathers from their back.

    Hard to tell from the pix but he is a regular full size rooster, right?
     
    Last edited: Oct 30, 2015

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