Rooster that wheezes with white/ shivering feet. help!

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by dandylion1, Feb 5, 2014.

  1. dandylion1

    dandylion1 Out Of The Brooder

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    Dec 4, 2013
    So my rooster has always had a wheeze after he crows so I always wondered if he had some health problem or a genetic disease. There was only two times where he was constantly wheezing and not just after he crowed but there was no connection for weather or anything. My coop has ventilation and none of the hens have this problem.I also just realized that when he picked up his foot it was shivering, and white ish in color (mostly on the top of his foot not the sides. Couldnt see the bottom.( its usually tan/pink)) Ive read that sick chickens are more susceptible to the cold but don't know what could be wrong with him. Is it just frostbite on his feet? Also, he is very agressive and Im terrified of him so if you know whats wrong is there an easy way to way to treat it? Ive heard people take the chicken into their house to warm them up but I obviously cant do that. Should I try to seperate him? Is there some type of chicken medicine that would help? Thanks in advance.
     
  2. Alaskan

    Alaskan The Frosted Flake

    If he is aggressive towards you, AND sick, I would just kill him and take him to the dump.

    Also, frostbite on the feet is horrid. It is difficult to keep clean and uninfected. So, if it is frostbite, and he isn't sweet enough for you to mess with his feet three times a day, just kill him and put him out of his misery.

    I sound like an axe murderer don't I? :oops:

    A great rooster is wonderful, but there is no reason to put up with a nasty one.
     
  3. dandylion1

    dandylion1 Out Of The Brooder

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    Dec 4, 2013
    Okay. Ive thought about giving him away because I dont like to deal with him but I guess you're right about killing him. I dont want to do it but I know a guy who might. Noody would want a sick rooster anyways. Im not sure its frostbite though. I thought frostbite was usually black but maybe its just less severe. And he acts normal. He eats, drinks, runs around... Well. I only wanted a rooster to get chicks but I dont think id want to hatch anything from him. Sorry Im rambling.Thank you though for telling me your opinion. Ive procrastinated about what to do with him for too long. Unless someone can tell me whats wrong and how to fix it in a way that does not include loosing an eye, I think Ill go with what you said. It was my last resort but I guess its the best option. Ill give him a few days to see if he gets better but he probably wont.:(
    and you do not totally sound like an axe murderer. Just a little bit. Its just the part about the dump.
    And maybe i can get a nicer rooster this spring so I guess it isnt too bad. :)
     
  4. Alaskan

    Alaskan The Frosted Flake

    Yep, nice roosters are wonderful, and they do exist, but unfortunately you often have to go though several bad ones first.
     
  5. dandylion1

    dandylion1 Out Of The Brooder

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    Dec 4, 2013
    Yah. I think I will try to skip the rest of the bad roosters and get a silkie.:p
     
  6. fluffychooks

    fluffychooks Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 22, 2014
    The cockerel in question should be checked for gapeworm, which will cause open mouthed, laboured breathing. There will be a small (but visible) reddish "Y" shaped worm (male and female mated and joined together) at the back of the throat, obstructing breathing. There are several meds available to treat gapeworm- I believe Flubenvet will kill the worms. If the cockrel doesn't respond to the worming meds, he may need antibiotics (though it sounds like it is not a respiratory infection, as he would have other symptoms, like foamy eyes, sneezing, mucky nostrils, gurgling...). If that is the case, skip the terramycin (not extremely effective) and the tetramycene (about the same as terramycin) as they will not likely touch a chronic infection. High doses of baytril (15 mg/kg, twice a day, for 7 days, orally or injected IM) or tylan injectable (35 mg/kg, two to three times a day, orally or IM for 7-10 days) is your best bet. I still suspect gapeworm...
     
  7. fluffychooks

    fluffychooks Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 22, 2014
    um also you may want to xray him for damaged internals k
     

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