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Rooster troubles!!! Advice needed for this newbie!

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by cajun41887, Apr 3, 2016.

  1. cajun41887

    cajun41887 Out Of The Brooder

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    We have a mixed flock of 10 chickens. All were supposed to be hens, but alas, we find ourselves with not one, but 2 Roos! One is a Delaware and the other a black Australorp. Delaware runs the show. They are all 5.5 months old. Delaware used to be super sweet, now he's a mating, crowing flogging son of a you know what. I can't blame him for being a roo, he's just doing what he's wired to do. Needless to say, he's flogging me and my small kids, so he has to go! My question is, will the black Australorp turn into a horrible dictator once his first in command is gone? I know nobody can say for sure, but in your experience, is it likely? I like having a roo around as we want fertile eggs down the line and we are going to free range and we have a lot of Hawks, so having a roo to help protect is good. We also enjoy the crowing and the girls seem to enjoy having a man around, (just not the Delaware). Anyone have any thoughts? What's the best way besides butchering to get rid of the other roo? I don't want him to end up in a cock fighting situation, but I'm realistic and know I have no control once he's gone and I'm sure most people will be looking to cook him especially since he's a ***** hole. I don't want him to go anywhere there are children, he's a liability. Once he's gone, will other roo step up and take over all the roo responsibilities? They seem to have their own girls and often separate into 2 groups when free ranging. Will the Delaware's girls automatically go with the Australorp once the other is gone? What breeds are generally not complete buttholes? I've heard RIR can be bad, but Australorps also have a reputation. Delawares were supposed to be good, but we apparently have one who didn't read the book! I've tried asserting my dominance and not backing down from him, but he immediately moves to flogging. Wanted to try pinning him to the ground or picking him up, but I can't get near him. I've had livestock all my life, just not chickens and I work in the vet field, so have a lot of animal experience. I'm not delusional and think we can have a rooster as a pet. He's the protector of the flock and to be respected, but I also expect him to respect me and my kids.
     
    Last edited: Apr 3, 2016
  2. Folly's place

    Folly's place Overrun With Chickens

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    Your idiot Delaware need that dinner invitation, ASAP, before he really injures someone (especially a child!!!). If you can't eat him, someone else will be delighted to get him. Your other cockrel will do what he does, and only time will tell. I don't hand feed my cockrels, and always walk 'through' them, because I want respect. Only polite healthy cocks get to have offspring; jerks are likely to produce more of the same. Mary
     
  3. cajun41887

    cajun41887 Out Of The Brooder

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    Thanks Mary! We've never hand fed them once we knew they were cockerels. Australorp will still walk away from me if I walk towards him as he should. Delaware is going to have a date with dinner, just not for us. I'm sure I'll be able to find someone to make a meal out of him. Such a shame, cause he's gorgeous, but you're right, I don't need his a$$hole sons running around someday! That's like Armageddon!
     
    1 person likes this.
  4. blucoondawg

    blucoondawg Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Flogging people is not what a rooster is supposed to do that is the sign of a bad rooster, especially if he's already doing it at that young age. Not worth having around
     

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